FAQ about Domestic Violence

Posted below are some frequently asked questions about domestic violence. (Information provided by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, www.nnedv.org.)

What is domestic violence?

  • Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive, controlling behavior that can include physical abuse, emotional or psychological abuse, sexual abuse or financial abuse (using money and financial tools to exert control).
  • Domestic violence is a pervasive, life-threatening crime that affects millions of individuals across the United States regardless of age, economic status, race, religion or education.
  • High-profile cases of domestic violence will attract headlines, but thousands of people experience domestic abuse every day. They come from all walks of life.
  • In a 24-hour survey, NNEDV found that U.S. domestic violence programs served nearly 65,321 victims and answered more than 23,045 crisis hotline calls in one day alone.
  • Batterers make it very difficult for victims to escape relationships. Sadly, many survivors suffer from abuse for decades.
  • It’s important for survivors to know that the abuse is not their fault, and they are not alone. Help is available for those who suffer from domestic violence.

What are resources available for victims?

Survivors have many options, from obtaining a protection order to staying in a shelter, or exploring options through support group or anonymous calls to a local domestic violence shelter or hotline program. There is hope for victims, and they are not alone. There are thousands of local shelters across the United States that provide safety, counseling, legal help, and other resources for victims and their children. Information and support is available for victims of abuse, their friends and family:

  • If you are in danger, call 911, a local hotline or a national hotline. The U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline provides confidential and anonymous support by phone 1-800-799-7233 or TTY 1-800-787-3224. Locally, Hubbard House can help. Call the Hubbard House 24-Hour Domestic Violence at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119 to speak with an advocate.
  • Before using online resources, know that your computer or phone may not be safe. Some abusers are misusing technology to stalk and track all of a partner’s activities

Why do victims sometimes return to or stay with abusers?

  • A better question is, “Why does the abuser choose to abuse?”
  • The deck is stacked against the victim when confronted with leaving or not.
  • Abusers work very hard to keep victims in relationships.
  • There is a real fear of death or more abuse if they leave.
  • In fact, a victim’s risk of getting killed greatly increases when they are in the process of leaving or have just left.
  • On average, three women die at the hands of a current or former intimate partner every day.
  • We, as a community, must do more to ensure the safety of victims when they leave.
  • Batterers are very good at making victims think that the abuse is their fault. Victims often believe that if they caused the violence, they can also stop it.
  • Victims stay because they are made to think they cannot survive on their own, financially or otherwise. Often abusers create a financial situation that makes leaving nearly impossible.
  • Survivors sometimes want the abuse to end, not the relationship.
  • A survivor may return to the abuser because that’s the person she the survivor fell in love with, and she believes his promises to change. It’s not easy for anyone to let go of hopes and dreams.

Do abusers show any potential warning signs?

There is no way to spot an abuser in a crowd, but most abusers share some common characteristics. Some of the subtle warning signs include:

  • They insist on moving too quickly into a relationship.
  • They can be very charming and may seem too good to be true.
  • They insist that you stop participating in leisure activities or spending time with family and friends.
  • They are extremely jealous or controlling.
  • They do not take responsibility for their actions and blame others for everything that goes wrong.
  • They criticize their partner’s appearance and make frequent put-downs.
  • Their words and actions don’t match.
  • Any one of these behaviors may not indicate abusive actions, but it’s important to know the red flags and take time to explore them. 

Is it possible for abusers to change?

  • Yes, but they must make the choice to change.
  • It’s not easy for an abuser to stop abusive behavior, and it requires a serious decision to change. Once an abuser has had all of the power in a relationship, it’s difficult to change to a healthy relationship with equal power and compromises.
  • Sometimes an abuser stops the physical violence, but continues to employ other forms of abuse – emotional, sexual, or financial. Some abusers are able to exert complete control over a victim’s every action without using violence or only using subtle threats of violence. All types of abuse are devastating to victims.

Are men victims of domestic violence?

  • Yes, men are sometimes victims of domestic abuse.
  • A 2001 U.S. study revealed that 85 percent of the victims were female with a male batterer. The other 15 percent includes intimate partner violence in gay and lesbian relationships and men who were battered by a female partner.
  • One in four women will be the victim of domestic violence at some point in her lifetime.
  • Women are 90-95 percent more likely to suffer domestic violence than are men.
  • When we talk about domestic violence, we’re not talking about men versus women or women versus men. We’re talking about violence versus peace. We’re talking about control versus respect.
  • Domestic violence affects us all, and all of us – women, children and men – must be part of the solution.

How does the economy affect domestic violence?

  • A sour economy does not cause domestic violence but can make it worse. It’s like throwing gasoline on a fire.
  • The severity and frequency of abuse can increase when factors associated with a bad economy are present.
  • Job loss, housing foreclosures, debt, and other factors contribute to higher stress levels at home, which can lead to increased violence.
  • As the violence gets worse, a weak economy limits options for survivors to seek safety or escape.
  • Domestic violence programs need more staff and funding to keep up with the demand for their services.
  • Victims may have a more difficult time finding a job to become financially independent of abusers.

What can I do to help?

  • Everyone can speak out against domestic violence. The problem will continue until society stands up with one resounding voice and says, “no more!”
  • Members of the public can donate to local, statewide or national anti-domestic violence programs or victim assistance programs.
  • We can teach our children about what healthy relationships look like by example and by talking about it.
  • You can call on your public officials to support life-saving domestic violence services and hold perpetrators accountable.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

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Safety Plan

Safety planning for someone involved in an abusive relationship is a necessary and important step. Often, writing out your plan helps you regain security and control of your life. Your safety plan should be used as a guide and a reminder of ways you and your family can increase your safety. If you are planning on leaving your abuser, it can be a very dangerous time. Women are more likely to be seriously hurt or even killed during or after leaving their abusers than at any other time in their abusive relationships. This is why it is imperative to have a safety plan.

To begin creating your safety plan, print (if safe to do so) and fill out the form below as appropriate to your situation. Keep it in a safe place that the abuser is unlikely to find and refer to it frequently to bring strength when you need it most.

Safety Plan – Printable Version

Hubbard House can help. Call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 to speak to an advocate who can help you develop your safety plan.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

You Can Wear Your Purple and Pink Side by Side

October is often recognized as Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  The color pink can be found on pins, shirts, posters and even on yogurt lids.  However, October is also National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

 Statistics show that one in every eight women develops breast cancer at sometime in her life.  Yet, did you know that one in every four women will be affected by domestic violence at some point in her life?  Domestic violence is often an unspoken issue.  There are four main types of abuse in domestic violence situations: physical, emotional, economic and sexual abuse.  Unfortunately many people do not realize this, and as a result, do not seek help.  Just like with any other issue that is worth taking a stand for, the first step to a solution is awareness. 

 

It can be difficult for individuals to feel the need to take a stand to end domestic violence if they feel it does not directly affect them.  Domestic violence affects all ages, ethnicities and economic levels; domestic violence is everyone’s issue. 

 

If you’re thinking it doesn’t affect you, think about this. . .

 

Why does health insurance costs as much as it does? Because, the health-related costs of rape, physical assault, stalking, and homicide committed by intimate partners exceeds $5.8 billion each year. Of that amount, nearly $4.1 billion is for direct medical and mental health care services.

 

What about your co-worker who lately hasn’t had their head in the game?  It could be the result of living in a violent or unhealthy relationship. Due to lost productivity, violence against women costs companies $727.8 million annually. In fact, over 7.9 million paid workdays are lost each year due to violence against women.

 

Is your teenager daughter in a relationship? One in five teens in a serious relationship reports having been hit, slapped, or pushed by a partner and more than one in four teenage girls in a relationship report enduring repeated verbal abuse.

 

Do you know who your children hang out with?  Your children’s friends and peers can be a quite an influence on them.  Children from violent homes are more likely to have behavioral and physical health problems including depression, anxiety, and violence toward others. They are also more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs, participate in promiscuous sexual activity, and attempt suicide.  Up to 40 percent of violent juvenile offenders witnessed domestic violence in their homes. 

 

Domestic violence leads to the loss of productivity, friends, and family; the cost to society is high.  As an individual, a business owner, a community leader, we have to take a stand against abuse; domestic violence affects us all in one way or another. 

Across the country, families and friends of victims have adopted the purple ribbon to remember and honor their loved ones who have lost their lives at the hands of a person they once loved and trusted.  Domestic violence centers such as Hubbard House wear the purple ribbon to raise awareness about the crime of domestic violence in their communities. 

 

During October, while we as a community are raising awareness about breast cancer statistics and how we can help fund research to find a cure for breast cancer, we should also recognize that we need to raise awareness about domestic violence and that there is help for those in need.  Both issues are incredibly important, and together we can all make a difference.

 You don’t have to stop wearing your pink ribbon, just put a purple ribbon beside it! 

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

LGBTQ Domestic Violence on the Rise

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) released a report Wednesday, Oct. 26, on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer domestic/intimate partner violence in the United States. The Report found that LGBTQ domestic/intimate partner violence reports increased 15 percent since 2008 and the murder rate related to LGBTQ domestic/intimate partner violence has increased by 50 percent since 2007.

Experts believe that domestic violence occurs in the LGBTQ community with the same amount of frequency and severity as in the heterosexual community. Laws for protection of same-sex victims differ widely across the United States, and many victims of LGBTQ relationship abuse are reluctant to seek help due to fear of discrimination and bias. Therefore, the presence of domestic violence in LGBTQ relationships is vastly underreported and abuse crimes are often reported as something other than domestic violence.

LGBTQ Domestic Violence Statistics:

  • Approximately 50 percent of the lesbian population has experienced or will experience domestic violence in their lifetimes.
  • Gay and bisexual men experience abuse in intimate partner relationships at a rate of 2 in 5, which is comparable to the amount of domestic violence experienced by heterosexual women.  
  • In one year, 44 percent of victims in LGBTQ domestic violence cases identified as men, while 36 percent identified as women.
  • 78 percent of lesbians report they have either defended themselves or fought back against an abusive partner.
  • The most common age of victims reporting LGBTQ domestic violence are those between the ages of 30-39 years.

Types of Abuse:

  • Physical: the threat of harm or any forceful physical behavior that intentionally or accidentally causes bodily harm or property destruction.
  • Sexual: any forced or coerced sexual act or behavior motivated to acquire power and control over the partner. It is not only forced sexual contact but also contact that demeans or humiliates the partner and instigates feelings of shame or vulnerability – particularly in regards to the body, sexual performance or sexuality.
  • Emotional/Verbal: any use of words, voice, action or lack of action meant to control, hurt or demean another person. Emotional abuse typically includes ridicule, intimidation or coercion.
  • Financial: the use or misuse, without the victim’s consent, of financial or other monetary resources of the partner or of the relationship.
  • Identity Abuse: using personal characteristics to demean manipulate and control the partner. Some of these tactics overlap with other forms of abuse, particularly emotional abuse. This category is comprised of the social “isms”, including racism, sexism, ageism, able-ism, beauty-ism, as well as homophobia. Includes threats to “out” victim.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship Hubbard House can help. Please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Hubbard House by the Numbers

Hubbard House is the domestic violence center that serves victims and their children in Duval and Baker counties. In 2009, there were more than 7,800 incidents of domestic violence reported in Duval and Baker counties.  Hubbard House provided services to more than 6,200 victims of domestic violence within the last year. Listed below is some information on what Hubbard House is doing in its efforts to end domestic violence in our communities.

6,231 – Total Clients Served Agency Wide

48,599- Counseling Hours Provided

Emergency Shelter

Emergency Shelter services include emergency shelter, 24-hour emergency hotline, counseling for adults and children, support groups and advocacy, therapeutic childcare center, and school-based education. 

1,021 – Clients Sheltered

  • Women – 562
  • Children – 450
  • Men – 9

3,429- Hotline Calls Received

26,090 – Days of Shelter

13,745 – Adult Counseling Hours

15,314 – Children’s Counseling Hours 

Outreach Services

Outreach services include: 24-hour emergency response, support groups for adult victims, psycho-educational groups for children, case management services, crisis intervention, individual counseling, advocacy, relocation assistance, court advocacy, and Helping At Risk Kids (HARK), a therapeutic intervention and prevention program designed to empower children from abusive homes.

4,702 – Clients Served

  • Women – 3,576
  • Children – 547
  • Men – 579

14,084 – Adult Counseling Hours

5,456 – Children’s Counseling Hours

Community Education Outreach

Hubbard House staff and volunteers speak to many different segments of the public, including civic and community-based groups, professional and educational audiences, and governmental and business employees.  Hubbard House offers a Relationship Abuse Prevention Program (RAP), which is a violence-prevention program aimed at both knowledge and behavior change education for middle and high school students. 

222 – Presentations/Trainings

14,229 – Presentation/Training Participants 

5,245 – RAP Student Participants

Hubbard House Thrift Store
In addition to providing much needed financial support to the agency, the Thrift Store also provides free clothing, furniture, and household items to Hubbard House clients and their children to help them in their transition to a peaceful life.

$38,614 – Value of Goods Donated to Clients

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Am I a Victim/Do I know a Victim of Domestic Violence?

Am I a victim/Do I know a victim?

Sometimes it’s hard to recognize that you are a victim of abuse. Here is a checklist to help you define instances of abuse.

  • Have you or your children been shoved, slapped, punched, kicked, or hit?
  • Have you been told you can’t do anything right, you’re an unfit parent, or you don’t deserve anything?
  • Do you believe the violence is somehow your fault?
  • Are you isolated from friends and family because of your partner’s jealousy?
  • Have you been hurt when you were sick or pregnant?
  • Has your partner threatened to hurt your child/children or pet?
  • Have you been accused of having affairs?
  • Does your partner’s threats of violence control your decisions or influence your behavior?
  • Have you had things thrown at you or had personal items destroyed or taken from you?

If you have experienced or are experiencing these circumstances, you are a victim of abuse. You can end the abuse and be safe – Hubbard House can help! If you are in immediate danger, get help now – call 911. If you are not in immediate danger, but are planning to leave an abusive home or are not sure what you should do call the 24-hour Hubbard House Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

What do I do if I know someone is a victim?

Here are some ideas for you to consider when you know or suspect someone is a victim of domestic violence. Always remember that you must consider the safety of the victim as well as your and your family’s safety when offering assistance. When in doubt, call the police; it is not recommended to engage in a physical confrontation with an abuser. The decision to shelter a victim if their life is being threatened should be used with great caution and may not be the safest option for you or the victim of domestic violence.

  • Call 911.
  • Call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114. You do not need to be the actual victim to ask for assistance.
  • Recommend that the victim call Hubbard House.
  • Let the victim know you are concerned for her/his safety and help her/him secure safety and shelter.
  • Don’t ask questions that blame the victim such as: “Why haven’t you left?” “How come you let that happen?” “What did you say to provoke him/her?” Remember, victims of domestic violence often are afraid to leave their abuser or don’t have the resources to leave, thus they remain in the relationship because they don’t feel they have any other choice or option.
  • Be supportive and offer resources for safety.
  • Follow through on your promises of support.
  • Remain nonjudgmental.

You can help end the cycle of violence for someone you care about and love. Let Hubbard House be a resource for you to better understand how you can help. Call our 24-hour Hubbard House Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

What We All Can Do to End Domestic Violence in our Community

Domestic violence is not an individual, family or law enforcement issue; it affects all ages, genders, ethnicities and economic levels – it is a community issue. In 2009, there were 7,800 domestic violence offenses reported in Duval County. Within the last year, Hubbard House provided services to more than 6,200 victims of domestic violence.  It will take the entire community working together to end this devastating problem. Listed below are just a few ways we each can help end domestic violence:

  • Wear a purple ribbon to raise awareness about domestic violence
  • Connect with Hubbard House online at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or at www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse to receive posts about domestic violence statistics, news, and events happening in our community
  • Hold a candlelight vigil or ceremony to remember the victims of domestic abuse, to honor the survivors, and to celebrate those working to end violence against women and children
  • Plan a community benefit/fundraiser for Hubbard House or your local domestic violence center to raise much-needed funds and to educate the community about available services
  • Keep issues before the public: write letters to newspapers; perhaps editorials or comments to print media as well as TV and radio
  • Organize inter-agency activities with police departments, PTA’s, community colleges and universities, women’s clubs, girl and boy scouts, other social and civic groups or human service agencies
  • Advocate for continued training for law enforcement, medical professionals, educators, etc. on domestic violence
  • Refrain from sayings, jokes, or materials that minimize abuse
  • Avoid speech that contains violent images (“What a slap in the face”)
  • Know what help is available in your community: visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more
  • Know what the warning signs of abuse are
  • Attend an extended training on domestic violence; continue to educate yourself on the dynamics of domestic violence and its effects
  • Invite a representative from Hubbard House to speak to your class, civic group, workplace or faith community

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Make a Difference Day

Each year, millions of people join together on the fourth Saturday in October to participate in Make a Difference Day. Created by USA WEEKEND Magazine, Make a Difference Day is the largest national day of helping others. Last year, more than 3 million people came together on that day to help an estimated 30 million people improving their communities.

This year Make a Difference Day will be held Saturday, October 23, and encourages everyone to take action and offer help to someone in need. Americans are people of action, especially when it comes to helping others. A recent WE TV-USA WEEKEND online poll showed that nearly three-quarters say they would rather invest their time and energy in a cause than simply write a check.

Although Make a Difference Day is centered around one day of the year, volunteers are needed almost everyday and everywhere. If you cannot make a difference today, there is nothing that stops you from making a difference any other day of the year.

Volunteers founded Hubbard House 34 years ago, and the agency continues to depend heavily on the generous gifts of time from many deeply loyal volunteers. Hubbard House thrives because volunteers serve in all Hubbard House programs; some provide help on a regular basis while others work on special projects as the need arises.

Within the last year, Hubbard House provided shelter and outreach services to over 6,200 clients. Hubbard House relies on the continued support of the community to serve victims of domestic violence and their families.  The support of the community also helps to prevent future abuse.

Hubbard House’s volunteers come from diverse backgrounds and include women, men, and teens above the age of 16. There are no minimum work or educational requirements to volunteer. All you need is the capacity to care and a willingness to help.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone. If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Crime Prevention Month

Every year in the United States, around 11 million crimes are reported to law enforcement. This number has continued to decrease since the 1990s, but there is still a lot to be done to lower it. Law enforcement officers frequently work to prevent crimes and they need all the support possible from the community to succeed in lowering the crime rates. Therefore, October is recognized as National Crime Prevention Month, and everyone is encouraged to show their support and help keep their community safe from crime.

Crime prevention is most effective when citizens get involved and work together. For more than 25 years, government agencies, civic groups, schools, businesses and youth organizations have reached out to educate the public, showcase their accomplishments, and explore new partnerships during this special month. October has become the official month for recognizing and celebrating the practice of crime prevention, while promoting awareness of important issues such as victimization, volunteerism and creating safer and more caring communities.  

Domestic violence is a crime that can take on many faces. It is and epidemic affecting individuals in every community, regardless of age, economic status, race, religion, nationality or educational background. Domestic violence results in physical injury, psychological trauma and sometimes death. Moreover, the consequences of domestic violence can cross generations and truly last a lifetime.

Each year, an estimated 1.3 million women are victims of physical assault by an intimate partner. Excluded here are all the other cases of domestic violence, involving emotional, economic, and sexual abuse. Emotional and economic abuse may not be viewed as severe crimes in the same sense as physical and sexual assault are. It is often very hard for an outsider to recognize signs of emotional and economic abuse, compared to more obvious warning signs such as bruises and wounds from physical injuries. Therefore, many cases of domestic violence go unnoticed, and domestic violence has become one of the most chronically underreported crimes.

Domestic violence will not just go away by itself. It is crucial that everyone works together to end abuse and support those who have already fallen victims to the violence. During National Crime Prevention Month, individuals may choose to help on at least one of three levels:  family, neighborhood or community. Whichever level you choose to work on, it is all for the same cause: to stop the prevalence of violence and crime in this world.

Hubbard House supports National Crime Prevention Month and encourages the community to speak out against all crimes, including domestic violence, and help fulfill our mission of Every Relationship Violence-Free.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Domestic Violence Victim Bill Of Rights

  • You have the right NOT to be abused.
  • You have the right to anger over past beatings.
  • You have a right to choose to change the situation.
  • You have a right to freedom from fear of abuse.
  • You have a right to request and expect assistance from police or social agencies.
  • You have a right to share your feelings and not be isolated from others.
  • You have a right to want a better role model of communication for yourself and your children.
  • You have a right to be treated like an adult.
  • You have a right to leave the battering environment.
  • You have a right to privacy.
  • You have a right to express your own thoughts and feelings.
  • You have a right to develop your individual talents and abilities.
  • You have a right to legally prosecute the abusing spouse.
  • You have a right not to be perfect.

(Adapted from; Victimology: An International Journal., Vol. 2 1977-78, No. 3-4, p.550)

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.