What is Abuse

Domestic violence affects thousands of women, children, and men in Duval and Baker Counties each year. There are four main types of abuse in domestic violence situations: physical, emotional, economic, and sexual. Unfortunately, many people don’t realize this and as a result, do not seek help. Domestic violence is often more than an isolated incident. It is a recurring cycle of violence that often increases in severity over time. Domestic violence does not “simply just go away.” To help better understand domestic violence, here are some examples of abuse:

Physical Abuse

  • Slapping, hitting, choking, kicking, shoving, shaking, punching
  • Throwing objects
  • Threats of violence
  • Physical restraint
  • Spitting

 

Emotional Abuse

  • Name calling, insults, verbal attacks
  • Humiliation
  • Destroying keepsakes
  • Harming pets
  • Making the partner feel guilty for the abuse
  • Making her/him feel bad about themselves
  • Extreme jealousy
  • Playing mind games

 

Sexual Abuse

  • Forcing sexual acts
  • Forcing overly aggressive or violent sexual acts
  • Coerced sex through manipulation or threat
  • Harassing e-mails or other communication containing sexual content
  • Forcing a partner to watch pornography or other sexual acts
  • Denying contraception or protection

 

Economic Abuse

  • Not allowing a partner to work
  • Financial isolation by limiting access to money
  • Controlling financial decisions without partner’s consent
  • Forcing partner to use money for the abuser’s needs while neglecting other family and victim’s needs

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

How Social Media Can Help End Domestic Violence

In today’s society almost everything can be done using the Internet. We pay our bills, do our shopping, read the news, and catch up with friends all online. Websites such as Facebook and Twitter have become virtual worlds in which we spend an increasing amount of time during our daily lives. Not only do they allow us to keep track of what is going on in our own and other peoples’ social networks, but they have also become an important marketplace where companies and organizations can easily connect with their target publics.

Nowadays, with just a click of a button you can help support a cause and raise awareness about issues that affect our community every day, such as domestic violence. One of the most crucial functions of these social media networks is to bring awareness to organizations that are looking to spread the word about what they do, such as Hubbard House.

Hubbard House, a certified domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties, raises awareness about domestic violence by using Facebook and Twitter to spread the word. Domestic violence is a pervasive issue in our community. In 2009, more than 7,800 incidents of domestic violence were reported to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and Hubbard House provided services to more than 6,200 clients. One key to prevent and end domestic violence is awareness. The use of the Internet makes it easier for anyone to be an advocate for the cause.

How can you help?

Get connected with the cause at:

www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc

www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse

www.hubbardhouse.wordpress.com

http://jacksonville.com/users/inside-hubbard-house

Join the Domestic Violence Awareness Month Purple Ribbon Campaign:

Individuals are encouraged to connect with Hubbard House on Facebook at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse and change their social media profile picture to the Hubbard House Purple Ribbon profile picture to show their support for ending domestic violence.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Effects of Domestic Violence on the Workplace

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence stated that a recent survey found 44 percent of respondents had personally experienced domestic violence’s impact on the workplace, most frequently because a co-worker was a victim. In fact, it is estimated that the cost of lost productivity due to domestic violence equals $727.8 million annually.

Though you may not feel that you are directly affected by domestic violence, it is unfortunately a more common problem than we all think. Your co-worker may be a victim or the family member of a victim. Domestic violence can result in reduced productivity, increased medical expenses, absenteeism and heightened risk of violence at the workplace. Often times the so called “private matter” does not stay at home. When a victim attempts to leave the relationship, the workplace becomes one of the few places that the abuser can locate and harm them. The abuse can even spill into the work place when the victim is harassed by threatening phone calls or even absent because of abuse-related injuries. The abuser can stalk the workplace and use company resources to get a hold of the victim. Co-workers may even be witnesses to the abuse on the victim. Some abusers may go as far as to threaten or harass coworkers of the victim. According to the National Safe Workplace Institute Survey, 94 percent of corporate security directors surveyed rank domestic violence as a high security problem at their company

You may not feel that the subject of domestic violence applies to your workplace but it can be a wonderful place to provide help to victims and prevent associated risks. In fact, according to a Roper Starch Worldwide Study for Liz Claiborne, Inc., 66 percent believe their company’s financial performance would benefit from addressing the issue of domestic violence among their employees.

There are many things you can do in your workplace to help raise awareness on the subject and offer to help to those who may need it. Here are a few things you can do:

1. Put up posters around your workplace that display national and local domestic violence hotline numbers.

2. Have fliers available about domestic violence prevention and safety planning.

3. Invite a representative from Hubbard House, or your local domestic violence shelter, to speak to your workplace.

4. Call the police if you see or hear any signs of domestic violence.

5. Take a moment to talk to others about domestic violence and what they can do to help.

With only 4 percent of all businesses training employees on domestic violence and its impact on the workplace, you can make a tremendous difference by simply bringing up the issue and talking about it at work.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Marina Martin

Shelter Needs

Hubbard House has grown from being the first domestic violence shelter established in the state of Florida in 1976, to providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. Without Hubbard House, many of these victims’ hope for peace, dreams of tomorrow, and strength for their children is lost

Every year Hubbard House relies on the community to contribute financial and personal resources to help advocates continue to serve victims of domestic violence and their families and to help prevent future abuse. You can be a part of the solution. Your donations help victims survive the odds.

  • They get help rebuilding their lives…
  • Their children learn to break the cycle of violence…
  • Their abusers take responsibility for their actions…
  • They find safety and peace in making their homes whole again.

Some of Hubbard House’s strongest needs are items that can be collected. Below are current needs of the shelter.

Help stock our food pantry: canned pastas, soups, juice boxes, hamburger helper, individual snack size crackers, cereals, macaroni and cheese, tuna fish, salt, pepper and other spices.

Help stock the kitchen cabinets: pots, pans, dishware, silverware, mixing bowls, mixing spoons, measuring cups, can openers, spatulas, tongs, oven mitts.

Help stock the linen closet: blankets, pillows, sheets, towels, washcloths.

Help keep it clean: bleach, toilet paper, paper towels, dish soap, laundry soap.

Help take care of personal needs: body wash, loofah, soap, conditioner, shampoo, deodorant, perfume, toothpaste, toothbrushes, combs, feminine hygiene.

“Shower” our babies: diapers (sizes 3-5), blankets, baby wipes, pacifiers, bottles, bottle cleaners.

Help is a phone call away: Old cell phones are a lifesaving resource for victims of domestic violence. Collect old cell phones and donate them to Hubbard House so they can be recycled and distributed to clients at Hubbard House. The cell phones are programmed with the Hubbard House hotline and 911.

For more information on collection drives, please contact April Griffin at (904) 354-0076, ext. 301 or agriffin@hubbardhouse.org.

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Myths and Facts about Domestic Violence

Myth: If it’s so bad, wouldn’t they just leave?
FACT: There are many complicated reasons why it’s difficult for a person to leave an abusive partner. They may be financially dependent or have limited job skills or religious, cultural or family pressures may keep them in the relationship/marriage. One of the most common reasons for a person not to leave an abusive relationship is fear. They may have tried to leave before and were stopped; Their abuser may have threatened to take the children from them, or harm them even more if they leave. Women who leave their abusers could be at a greater risk of being killed by the abuser than those who stay. For those planning to leave an violent relationship help is available. Call 911 and/or the Hubbard House 24‐Hour Hotline at (904) 354‐3114 or (800) 500‐1119.

Myth: Domestic violence affects only a small percentage of the population and is rare.
FACT: National studies estimate that 3 to 4 million women are beaten each year by an intimate partner in our country. Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women between the ages of 15 and 44, and statistics show that a woman is beaten every nine to 15 seconds.

Myth: Domestic violence occurs only in poor, uneducated and minority families.
FACT: Domestic violence does not discriminate against age, gender, economic level or zip code. Studies of domestic violence consistently have found that battering occurs among all types of families, regardless of income, profession, region, ethnicity, educational level or race. However, the reason lower income victims and abusers are over‐represented in calls to police, domestic violence shelters and social services may be due to a lack of other resources.

Myth: All domestic violence is physical. Domestic violence is usually a one time, isolated occurrence.
FACT: Domestic Violence is a pattern of coercion and control that one person exerts over another. Domestic violence is not just one physical attack. It includes the repeated use of a number of tactics, including intimidation, threats, economic deprivation, isolation and psychological and sexual abuse. Physical violence is just one form of abuse utilized by batterers to maintain power and control over their spouse and/or partner.

Myth: Domestic violence usually only happens in married couples.
FACT: As many as one‐third of all high school and college‐age young people experience violence in an intimate or dating relationship. Physical abuse is equally as common among couples who are dating or married.

Myth: A person who is abused brings it upon their self by nagging or provoking their spouse/partner.
FACT: People are abused for reasons as ridiculous as: the dinner is cold; the laundry isn’t done; the children are being loud; the TV was turned to the wrong channel. Abusive people refuse to control their violent impulses. Even where the person may have reason to be angry, they have no right to express their anger violently.

Myth: Children are not affected when one parent abuses the other.
FACT: Studies show that in 50‐70% of cases in which a parent abuses another parent, the children are also physically abused. Children also suffer emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental impairments as a result of witnessing domestic violence in the home. In addition, children who experience domestic violence in their homes often grow up to repeat the same behavioral patterns.

Myth: Batterers are mentally ill.
FACT: Battering is a learned behavior, not a mental illness. Abusers’ experiences as children and the messages they get from society in general tell them that violence is an effective means to achieve power and control over their partners. Batterers should always be held accountable for their actions. There are programs available to help teach batterers how they can break the cycle of abuse. Call the Hubbard House First Step Batterers Intervention Program at (904) 354‐0076 ext. 283 for more information.

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

The Cycle of Abuse

In violent and unhealthy relationships there is a cycle of recurring patterns or phases of abuse. Abusive relationships consist of three stages, the tension building stage, the explosion stage, and the remorse/honeymoon stage. The length of each stage varies between couples, and not all abusive relationships fall under these three categories.

The tension building stage begins when the abuser becomes increasingly controlling.  It can take days, weeks, or even years for this stage to evolve and progress.  Most of the time the tension-building stage does not happen until a couple has known each other for a long period of time, after the couple moves in together or gets married. The victim frequently feels like he or she is “walking on eggshells,” and tends to accommodate the abuser in order to keep peace or please the abuser. The tension and control increase, cultivating into the abuse stage.

The explosion stage is a major verbally, emotionally or physically abusive incident that is instigated by the abuser. After a long tension-building stage, a certain event is usually the trigger of the explosion stage. This is the shortest stage, but often increases in severity each time through the cycle. During this time, it is not safe for the victim to fight back or retaliate; the victim can only wait it out. Victims often deny or minimize the seriousness of the injuries to the abuser to soothe them or avoid further abuse.

The last stage is the remorse/honeymoon phase. The abuser has calmed down and is very apologetic about his or her behavior. They promise they will never do it again and convince themselves and the victim they are serious this time about changing. The abuser is often very loving and kind, even promising to get help. This stage can very confusing and emotional for victims because they are seeing the caring and loving side of the partner they originally fell in love with. The abuser may blame him or herself for the explosion and gives hope to the victim that this is the last time.

Eventually, the explosion stage will increase in frequency, while the honeymoon stage will happen less often and during shorter episodes. Some abusers may repeat the cycle every day, while other abusers will repeat the cycle a few times a year.

It is important to understand that any type of abuse is unacceptable. Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties, wants people to know there are services available to help a victim break the cycle of abuse. Hubbard House provides emergency shelter, extensive adult and youth outreach services, individual and group counseling, therapeutic child care, court advocacy and more to victims of domestic violence free of charge.

Everyone deserves a violence-free life.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

Not all children have the wonderful childhood we all hope to provide for our own children. Many children live in fear and neglect, and each year, approximately 3.3 million children experience some form of domestic violence.

Domestic violence is the single most important forerunner to child abuse and 30 to 60 percent of perpetrators of partner abuse also abuse the children in the household. Child abuse may occur at any time between infancy and adolescence, and for every hour, as many as 115 children are abused.

Children who witness violent and abusive behavior in their homes are the most likely individuals to become perpetrators of domestic violence in the future. Men who are exposed to domestic violence in childhood are twice as likely to abuse their own partner and children, while women experiencing abuse in childhood are more likely to become victims of domestic violence in the future.

While 90 percent of children from violent homes witness their fathers beating their mothers, batterers often use unsupervised visits as an opportunity to psychologically abuse their children. This is often done in an effort to continue terrorizing the mother. These children tend to report stomach aches, diarrhea, nightmares, bedwetting, and violent behaviors against siblings and caretakers both before and after their visits.

Children react differently to abuse depending on age and gender. Common effects on children include anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, post-traumatic stress disorder, self-blaming, and self-destructive behaviors. Moreover, abused children are arrested by the police four times more often than non-abused children. A major issue is the failure among children to report crimes of domestic violence or sexual abuse due to shame, fear of retaliation, or fear of not being believed.

Domestic violence changes lives every day in our community. Not only does it kill, it robs families of peace of mind and security and children of their childhood.  Domestic violence is a learned behavior and we must stop the cycle of abuse.  Organizations such as Hubbard House offer programs to help with that process. Hubbard House offers a therapeutic day care center for children in residence at its emergency shelter, as well as, an intervention program, HARK (Helping At-Risk Kids), for children in the community who have witnessed domestic violence.  Individual counseling is also provided to children in shelter and through outreach.  All Hubbard House children’s programs provide guidance for children in safety planning, understanding and expressing one’s emotions, and non-violent conflict resolution.

The good news is that proactive prevention and intervention, through programs like those offered at Hubbard House, can significantly improve the lives of children who have been affected by domestic violence, thereby also advancing the well-being of the larger society in which they live.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Teen Dating Violence

It isn’t uncommon to turn to a page in a magazine and see a statistic on teens and their love life. For example, 57 percent of teens say they regularly go out on dates, and a third says they have a steady boyfriend or girlfriend. Also according to a survey done by Mediamark Research, Inc., out of 4,600 teens surveyed ages 12 to 17, 12 percent are currently in a relationship with someone they have been dating for more than a year. What isn’t as common is to hear that about one in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship.

Dating violence does not just occur between adults, it occurs among teens as well. It can happen to any teen no matter their race, gender, economic level, religion, or sexual orientation. Unfortunately, many teens may not recognize the signs of abuse.

Romantic views of love can cloud the reality of their situation. Peer pressure is no stranger to teenagers and some teen abusers are pressured by their friends to act out violently against their partner. Young men may feel they have the right to control their partners or that they are displaying their masculinity by being physically aggressive. Young women often mistake their boyfriends’ possessiveness and jealousy for love.

Teen dating violence needs to be addressed and people need to realize that it does happen. Because many teens do not realize that they are in a violent relationship, it is up to us, their friends and family, to help make them aware and to help recognize the warning signs. Often times when problems occur in any situation, outsiders, such as friends and family, are usually the first ones to notice that something is wrong. Both friends and family can play an important role in supporting a teen going affected by dating violence. Not only can they notice the warning signs before others, but they can be there to support their child or friend.

Below are list of questions you can ask yourself to help figure out if a teenager you know is in an abusive relationship:

  • Have they become more isolated from family and friends?
  • Do they not enjoy doing activities that they use to enjoy?
  • Do they spend excessive amounts of time in contact with their partner?
  • Are they afraid to displease their partner?
  • Have they changed the way they act or dress?
  • Have they been physically injured by their partner?
  • Do they have unexplained injuries?
  • Have they become more aggravated and/or less independent?
  • Do they cancel plans or seem nervous to participate in certain activities?
  • Have they been called names, embarrassed, ridiculed, or insulted by their partner in front of you or other people?
  • Do they apologize or make excuses for the actions or behaviors of their partner?
  • Have they shown a loss of concentration?
  • Have they had unexplained injuries?
  • Do they seem persistent to be home at certain times to receive/make phone calls?
  • Do they seem withdrawn from what is going on around them?

Do you think you may be in an abusive relationship?

Below are some questions that you can ask yourself to find out if your relationship is unhealthy/abusive.

Does your partner…

  • Have a short temper?
  • Act very jealous?
  • Exaggerate fights?
  • Tell or suggest what you should wear?
  • Try to limit who you talk to?
  • Make you tell him/her where you are going and who you are with?
  • Tell you when you have to be home?
  • Put you down?
  • Take up most of your time?
  • Hurt you physically or throw things at you?
  • Get angry when you disagree with them?
  • Pressure you to engage in sexual activity that you feel uncomfortable with?
  • Make you feel like you can’t say no to sexual activity?
  • Embarrass you in front of others?

If you or someone you know is experiencing teen dating violence please know there is help available.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Marina Martin

Your Old Cell Phone Could Help End Domestic Violence

Did you know that donating your old, used, or even broken cell phone could potentially save a life? Your old cell phone can become an effective tool in the fight against domestic violence.

Through programs such as Hopeline from Verizon, Hubbard House is able to provide victims of domestic violence with refurbished phones for emergency situations. Having access to a phone is something most of us take for granted, but wireless phones can serve as a vital link to emergency or support services in a time of crisis, or as a reliable, safe connection to employers, family, and friends, as survivors rebuild their lives.

The importance of a victim of domestic violence having access to a phone becomes clear once you understand that nearly half of all the women murdered in the United States are killed by a current or former intimate partner.

Old, used, and even broken cell phones, donated to Hubbard House, are also recycled through the Shelter Alliance program to raise much-needed funds to support the life-saving programs and services Hubbard House provides to more than 6,200 victims of domestic violence annually.

This Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Hubbard House is holding a used cell phone collection drive and is asking that you please consider donating any old, used, or broken cell phones to Hubbard House to help in its efforts to end domestic violence.

Cell phone donations can be dropped off at the Hubbard House Thrift Store, at 6629 Beach Blvd (between University Boulevard and Dean Road), Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

For more information on donating used cell phones or inquiring on how your company, civic group, or organization can hold a cell phone collection drive to benefit victims of domestic violence please call (904) 354-0076.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone. If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

How Men Can Help End Domestic Violence

One in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime, and every nine to 12 seconds a woman is battered. Domestic violence has become the leading cause of injury and death to American women. There is no wonder domestic violence is considered a women’s issue, but that does not mean men should refrain from helping to end the abuse. Domestic violence is everyone’s concern and there are many ways men can get involved and make our community safer.

Men are a crucial element to violence prevention efforts. Men tend to be involved in the aspects of the community that supports and deals with family violence. We often see men as judges, lawyers, police officers, doctors, etc, who work with families in crisis. Some men are the neighbors, friends and family members, who support victims by reaching out and lending a hand. In addition to this, men are more likely to listen to other men when it comes to the perpetration of domestic violence, and fathers have enormous influence over the development of their children.

Men commit most domestic violence, but most men do not commit domestic violence. The majority of men who are not violent are unaware of the potential for their voice and actions to make a difference. Instead of remaining silent in the face of other men’s violence, it is time to speak up! Below is just a few example of how men can get involved:

  • Be role models to other men. Men are uniquely positioned to reach out to other men who are violent at home. It is important to let them know they need help, and there is someone who wants to help them. Let them know their behavior is not acceptable.
  • Take a vocal stand against domestic violence. Men speaking out can have a powerful effect in helping change social norms that support and perpetuate abuse.
  • Act as a role model to a child who lacks a positive male figure in his life. A male mentor can provide consistent support and help the child make a safety plan.
  • Take a leadership role in civic organizations, such as sports clubs, churches and neighborhood associations to speak out against violence in the home.
  • Understand how your own attitudes and actions may perpetuate sexism and violence. Work toward changing them.
  • Confront sexist, racist, homophobic, and all other prejudiced remarks or jokes.
  • Do not fund violence by using magazines, movies, music, or television programs that portray women in a sexually degrading or violent manner.
  • Organize or join a group – in school, your workplace, or among friends – to work against domestic violence.
  • Support those who you know to be survivors of domestic violence by never putting the blame on the victim.

There is no excuse for domestic violence. Everyone has to help end abuse. If we take responsibility and take action, each of us can help prevent domestic violence.

Visit www.menagainstdv.org for ideas on how you can get involved, and help end domestic violence.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone. If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook