Warning Signs of Abuse

Does your partner ever tell you how to behave, restrict your resources and incomes, choose who you are allowed to see, threaten to commit suicide if you leave, criticize and humiliate you, or in any other way try to belittle you and control your behaviors? If you feel like you have to walk on eggshells around your partner, constantly watching what you say and do in order to avoid a blow-up, chances are your relationship is unhealthy and abusive.

Many people, however, do not realize they are being abused. Domestic violence can take on many forms, including physical, sexual, emotional, and economic or financial abuse. Just because you are not battered and bruised does not mean you are not being abused.

The most obvious sign of abuse is fear of one’s partner. The fear is often derived from physical and/or sexual abuse, involving punches, slaps, kicks, forced sex, or any other act of violence that may physically injure the victim. Even if the incidence is a minor violent act or if it only occurred once or twice, it is still abuse. Although the physical violence may stop if the victim goes into a passive mode, the abuse is still present, but has shifted from physical to emotional abuse.

Emotional abuse is often minimized, overlooked and may be hard to recognize. Yet, it is more common than people think and can be carried out in several different ways; verbal attacks, isolation from friends and family, intimidation to cause obedience, controlling behaviors, threats of physical violence, dominance and humiliation are among the most common forms. The perpetrator may also deny and blame the victim for the abusive behavior.

An abuser’s goal is to control his or her victim and many times they use money to do so. Economic or financial abuse is a subtle form of emotional abuse where the abuser often attempts to restrict the victim’s income and expenses. This is often done by stealing or withholding the victim’s money, credit cards, sabotaging the victim’s job, preventing him or her from working outside the home, or in any other way controlling the victim’s finances.

Domestic abuse is a cyclic behavior in which the abuser goes through different stages, all building up to the violent act. After the abusive incident has occurred, the relationship goes back to “normal,” just to start the cycle all over again. What many people do not know is that victims who leave an abusive relationship run a higher risk of being killed by their abuser, than victims who stay in the relationship. However, the dangers of staying in this kind of relationships without seeking help are very real. Ninety-nine percent of all the women who died as a result of domestic violence from 2005 to mid-2006 never stayed in a shelter, and 95 percent had no contact with a certified domestic violence center within five years of their murder.

If you witness any warning signs of abuse in your own relationship, or in a friend, family member, or co-worker’s, take them very seriously. People who are being abused may  talk about their partner’s temper, jealousy, or possessiveness; have frequent injuries, with the excuse of “accidents”; dress in covering clothes; rarely appear in public without their partner; and show signs of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and suicidal thoughts. These are only a few examples of the behaviors a domestic violence victim may suffer from.  

Warning signs of abusive behavior:

Physical Abuse

  • Slapping, hitting, choking, kicking, shoving, shaking, punching
  • Throwing objects
  • Threats of violence
  • Physical restraint
  • Spitting

Sexual Abuse

  • Forcing sexual acts
  • Forcing overly aggressive or violent sexual acts
  • Coerced sex through manipulation or threat
  • Harassing e-mails or other communication containing sexual content
  • Forcing a partner to watch pornography or other sexual acts
  • Denying contraception or protection

Emotional Abuse

  • Name calling, insults, verbal attacks
  • Humiliation
  • Destroying keepsakes
  • Harming pets
  • Making the partner feel guilty for the abuse
  • Making her or him feel bad about themselves
  • Extreme jealousy
  • Playing mind games

Economic Abuse

  • Not allowing a partner to work
  • Financial isolation by limiting access to money
  • Controlling financial decisions without partner’s consent
  • Forcing partner to use money for the abuser’s needs while neglecting other family and victim’s needs.

No one should live in fear of the one they love.

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Domestic Violence in the Mainstream: Violent Music

Notions of domestic violence pop up everywhere around us; however, we often do not pay close enough attention for them to trigger a reaction within us.

Popular music, among other things, has a tendency to do this to us. Have we not all been singing along with songs on the radio without thinking about the words’ actual meaning in a literal manner? Song lyrics are one source of information that often talks about violence. Some lyrics may portray violence in a glorified manner, while others use music to condemn violence. Domestic violence, in particular, is mainly portrayed from three general perspectives within music: glorified, condemned, or educational/informational.

Glorification of violence is commonly found in rap music and derogatory terms regarding women are frequently used throughout the songs. Take Eazy E’s debut song “Boys-N-The-Hood,” for example. Many of us are familiar with this once very popular song and know the words well. Do we realize, though, that this is what they are actually saying?

“Went to her house to get her out of the pad. Dumb hoe said somethin that made me mad. She said somethin that I couldn’t believe. So I grabbed the stupid b***h by her nappy-a** weave. She started talkin s**t, wouldn’t you know. Reached back like a pimp, slapped the hoe.”

These words clearly glorify domestic violence and make it sound as if this behavior is perfectly normal. As the mean world syndrome suggests: the more we are exposed to negative things, the more we will believe that this is how reality works. 

“Face Down” by The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus is an example of a song condemning domestic violence. The lyrics speak from a third-person perspective, which is trying to understand the dynamics of the ongoing abusive relationship.           

“Cover up with makeup in the mirror. Tell yourself it’s never gonna happen again. You cry alone and then he swears he loves you … Do you feel like a man when you push her around? Do you feel better now as she falls to the ground? Well, I’ll tell you my friend, one day this world is going to end. As your lies crumble down, a new life she has found.”

These lines not only question the reasoning behind domestic violence, but also target the abuser in a way intended to make him or her reflect over what they actually get out of their abusive behavior. How will it ever make a person feel better by hurting somebody else, either physically or emotionally?

Moreover, many people may not realize that Eminem and Rihanna’s song, “Love The Way You Lie,” is a perfect example of the cycle of violence. Personally, I listened to this song for weeks without even realizing what it was actually talking about until I saw the music video. While the chorus may be quite ambiguous in explaining the victim’s emotions, the verses are truly descriptive.

“Here we go again. It’s so insane. Cause when it’s going good, it’s going great. I’m Superman with the wind in his bag. She’s Lois Lane. But when it’s bad, it’s awful … Next time I’m p****d, I’ll aim my fist at the dry wall. Next time. There will be no next time. I apologize, even though I know it’s lies. I’m tired of the games. I just want her back. I know I’m a liar. If she ever tries to f*****g leave again, I’mma tie her to the bed and set the house on fire.”

It is in these verses that the both the violent and the educational parts can be found. The scenario is described from the abuser’s perspective and the entire cycle of violence is played out throughout the song; the violent episode, the “honeymoon” phase, the tension building, and back to another violent episode.

Valuable information about domestic violence can be found in these songs, and it is important for us as listeners to understand what messages these types of songs are trying to send us. Of course, these are just songs. Listening to violent music does not immediately turn you into a violent person. However, music is a powerful instrument. Everyone reacts differently to music and its lyrics. The more violent music we are exposed to, the more likely we are to be affected by its messages. Thus, it may be a long shot, but our musical interpretations could be crucial in our effort to end to domestic violence.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Domestic Violence in the Mainstream: Violent Phrases

Kill. Hit. Bang. Fight. Beat. Shoot. Do you ever use these terms? Most people do, without even realizing what they are actually saying. We frequently use these verbs in our everyday conversations to illustrate our behaviors. Although domestic violence is often a hidden issue, the violent language is all around us.

Physical violence is often the one that leaves visible marks, but verbal violence may hurt just as much, if not worse. Words are like weapons; they wound sometimes. However, violent words have worked their way into our everyday conversations in an almost frightening way. These words have become so common that they often do not even bother us anymore. In certain scenarios, we might even laugh if someone says, “I’m going to kill you” or “you are a dead man.”

The violence is everywhere; seen on TV shows, heard in songs played on the radio, and, for some, even right in front of us in real life. For almost a decade now, Jacksonville has unfortunately been in the lead of crime rates in the United States, and in 2009, more than 7,800 cases of domestic violence were reported to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office. Violence is a prevalent issue, and as long as there is violent language, there will be violent behavior.

Violent Phrases Used in Everyday Conversations:

  • When push comes to shove
  • Beats me
  • Get away with murder
  • Hit me up
  • Punch line
  • If looks could kill
  • Twist your arm
  • Break a leg
  • Knocked up
  • Take a shot/stab at it
  • Slap in the face
  • Adding insult to injury
  • Bang for your buck
  • Roll with the punches
  • Shoot from the hip

We can all do a part in ending domestic violence. Try and remove phrases, songs, movies, and TV shows that glorify or downplay domestic violence from your daily activities. Together we can make a difference!

DID YOU KNOW: Domestic violence has occurred throughout written history. The phrase “rule of thumb” dates back to the mid-1600s in England when the concept of the “rule” was that it was acceptable for a man to beat his wife as long as he used a stick no bigger around than his thumb.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

Hubbard House Breakfast Does More Than Fill Stomachs

Hubbard House held its 16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast today, Thurs., Oct. 7, 2010, at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront Hotel. Around 500 community members attended to raise awareness about domestic violence, remember victims who have lost their lives, honor survivors, and send the message that ending domestic violence is a priority.

Domestic violence continues to be a pervasive issue that affects our community. Duval County has experienced historic lows in crime rate with the lone exception of domestic violence. In 2009, domestic violence police reports increased by 9 percent and the number of victims helped by Hubbard House increased by 13 percent.

“With the increase in domestic violence that our city is experiencing, now more than ever, is a time when we need the help of the entire community in order to end this crime,” said Ellen Siler, Hubbard House Chief Executive Officer. “Domestic violence is an issue that can affect anyone; it does not discriminate against economic level, gender, ethnicity, or age.”

The breakfast also featured the “Empty Place at the Table” exhibit, which is an exhibit displaying the stories of individuals, from our community, who tragically lost their lives as a result of domestic violence in 2009. “It was our hope that by displaying the stories of these eight individuals, the people of our community will put a face on domestic violence and be encouraged to get involved and break the cycle before other lives are lost,” said Jami Bueker, Hubbard House Chief Development Officer.

Deborah D. Tucker, Executive Director of the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence, was this year’s keynote speaker. Tucker is the founding Chair of the National Network to End Domestic Violence and helped write and pass the original Violence Against Women Act in 1994.

The Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast was presented by Joan L. Huffman, MD, Mrs. James S. Taylor, and the Weaver Family Foundation. All funds raised at the breakfast support the life-saving programs and services Hubbard House provides to more than 6,000 victims of domestic violence and their children annually.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center that serves victims and their children in Duval and Baker counties. In addition to shelter, the agency provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

SEE Red

One in four women is affected by domestic violence, and one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. To increase community awareness about the issues surrounding domestic violence, a provocative new exhibit that highlights an often ignored side of the issue arrived at the Jacksonville Main Library on Tues., Oct. 5, accompanied by the candid testimonial of a local domestic violence survivor. The SEE RED exhibit, sponsored by Verizon Wireless, focuses on batterer awareness. To help end the destructive cycle, SEE RED was created to captivate, educate and visually motivate passersby to stop, recognize the warning signs of abuse and help end domestic violence.

Launched in 2008, SEE RED is tasked with stopping the violence at the source, the batterers. From different perspectives, each of the four aptly dressed red mannequins tells the disturbing story of a domestic violence incident. Flagging the mannequins, two large banners display the chilling facts of domestic violence and provide contact information for where batterers, victims and those who know either can go to get help. The exhibit travels across Florida, generating awareness for the cause.

In addition to the SEE RED exhibit, the emotional testimonial of Starletha Cherry brought a very real element to the exhibit.

“During the years that domestic violence was a part of my life, it affected not only me but also my daughters, who gave me the courage to realize that I was better than the abuse,” said Cherry about her years of abuse.  Eager to share her story of survival, Cherry hopes to educate others so that lives can be saved.

“Domestic violence affects our children, our families and our friends. Through this exhibit, we hope to communicate that all of us have the power to stop the violence,” says Chuck Hamby, public relations manager for the Florida region of Verizon Wireless. “By thinking before you act or speaking up against the actions of others, you can save a life, a friend, a family member.”

Aspiring to break the destructive cycle of domestic violence, Verizon Wireless of Florida has teamed with Hubbard House and the Jacksonville Public Library System to bring this powerfully candid and emotional display of art to south Florida.

The Verizon Wireless SEE RED exhibit will be on display at the Main Library until Oct. 29, 2010.

About Verizon Wireless
Verizon Wireless operates the nation’s most reliable and largest wireless voice and 3G data network, serving more than 92 million customers. Headquartered in Basking Ridge, N.J., with 79,000 employees nationwide, Verizon Wireless is a joint venture of Verizon Communications (NYSE, NASDAQ: VZ) and Vodafone (LSE, NASDAQ: VOD). For more information, visit www.verizonwireless.com. To preview and request broadcast-quality video footage and high-resolution stills of Verizon Wireless operations, log on to the Verizon Wireless Multimedia Library at www.verizonwireless.com/multimedia.

 

About Hubbard House

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,200 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

 

About the Jacksonville Public Library

The Jacksonville Public Library is an American Star Library, selected from 7,268 public libraries nationwide by the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service.  The Jacksonville Public Library provides programs and services to Duval County residents at the Main Library and 20 branch locations with a collection of more than 3 million materials. More than 5.4 million people visited Jacksonville Public Libraries in 2009. For more information about the Jacksonville Public Library, call 630-BOOK (2665) or visit jaxpubliclibrary.org.  Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Clothesline Project

According to the Men’s Rape Prevention Project in Washington DC, 58,000 soldiers died in the Vietnam War. During the same time period, 51,000 women were killed as a result of domestic violence. In the summer of 1990, that statistic became the catalyst for a coalition of women’s groups in Cape Cod, Massachusetts to consciously develop a program that would educate, break the silence, and bear witness to one issue – violence against women.

One of the women, visual artist Rachel Carey-Harper, moved by the power of the AIDS quilt, presented the concept of using shirts hanging on a clothesline as the vehicle for raising awareness about this issue. The idea is fitting since “doing the laundry” was considered women’s work, and in the days of close-knit neighborhoods, women often exchanged information over backyard fences while hanging clothes out to dry.

The concept was simple, let each woman tell her story in her own ways using words and/or artwork to decorate her shirt. Once finished, she would hang her shirt on the clothesline. In addition to serving as an educational tool for those who view it, the Clothesline Project also becomes a healing tool for those who make a shirt. By hanging the shirt on the line, survivors, friends and family can turn their back on some of the pain from their experience and walk away. Additionally, the Clothesline Project allows those who are suffering in silence to understand they are not alone. The Clothesline Project honors survivors, as well as victims of intimate violence.

The process of designing a shirt gives each survivor a new voice to expose an often horrific and unspeakable experience that has dramatically altered the course of their life.

The shirts on the “clothesline” are color coded to represent the form of abuse the victim endured and whether the victim survived the abuse they experienced.

  • White t-shirts represent women who died as a result of violence.
  • Yellow or beige t-shirts represent assaulted or battered women.
  • Red, pink and orange t-shirts represent survivors of rape and sexual assault.
  • Blue and green t-shirts represent survivors of incest and sexual abuse.
  • Purple or lavender t-shirts represent women attacked because of their sexual orientation.
  • Black t-shirts represent women attacked for political reasons.

Information provided by www.clotheslineproject.com

The Hubbard House Clothesline Project will be displayed at the 16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast. The shirts displayed on the exhibit have been made throughout the years by Hubbard House clients, staff and volunteers.

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more. 

By Vicky Krook

16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast

Hubbard House will host its 16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast, Thursday, October 7, from 7:30-9:00 a.m., at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront Hotel in downtown Jacksonville. The breakfast is presented by Joan Huffman M.D., Mrs. James S. Taylor and the Weaver Family Foundation.

The breakfast serves as a time to observe National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, remember victims who have lost their lives, and honor survivors of domestic violence.

Domestic violence has increased in our community. Within the last year police reports have gone up by 9% in Duval County alone. There has not been an increase like that for many years – in fact, the numbers were decreasing until the economy declined. Despite budget cuts and alarming domestic violence increases the number of people helped by Hubbard House has increased by 13%.

All funds raised at the breakfast support the life-saving programs and services Hubbard House provides to more than 6,200 victims of domestic violence and their children annually. With your help families can live without violence in their lives and can end the cycle of abuse.

We need to send the message that ending domestic violence is a priority in our community. We hope you will consider joining us at this year’s event.

About the Keynote Speaker: Deborah D. Tucker, MPA, Executive Director of the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence, has been dedicated to ending violence against women since becoming a volunteer with the first rape crisis center in Texas in 1973. Debby has extensive experience on the national level. For three years, she served as Co-Chair of the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. She served as founding Chair of the National Network to End Domestic Violence and helped write and pass the original Violence Against Women Act in 1994. She also assisted in writing and passing the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act passed in 2005.

For more information or to purchase tickets visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org/hh/special.aspx.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

The Purple Ribbon

Domestic Violence Awareness Month is a time to remind our country of the hidden acts of violence many women, children and men face daily in their homes; a place they once associated with comfort and love. Wearing a purple ribbon is an easy way to show your support to end domestic violence.

In 2009, there were more than 116,000 reported cases of domestic violence in Florida. Hubbard House uses the purple ribbon to raise awareness about the crime of domestic violence in our community and encourages you to do the same.

Although purple is a symbol of pain and suffering that reminds us of the bruises many people have sustained at the hands of their abusers, purple is also a symbol of hope for those affected by domestic violence. People wearing purple ribbons let victims know someone cares about them, and they want to help end domestic violence. Wearing your purple ribbon in public not only raises awareness, but also inspires more people to get involved.

There are many easy ways to display your purple ribbon:

  • Attach purple ribbon pins to your shirt, hat, bag, wallet, keys, etc.
  • Tie a purple ribbon to your car’s antenna.
  • Wear items such as t-shirts, hats and bags with embroidered purple ribbons.
  • Hang purple ribbons on doors that are frequently used.
  • Wrap purple ribbons around highly visible trees and/or lampposts.

In addition to demonstrating support for victims and advocates, the display of purple ribbons throughout a community conveys a powerful message that there is no place for domestic violence in homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, or schools of its citizens.

Remember, while each October marks National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, domestic violence is not confined by calendars. Please help raise awareness about domestic violence by participating in this awareness campaign.

Locally, Hubbard House is asking that the community GO Purple on Thursday, October 7th, by wearing a purple item of clothing or a purple ribbon, or hosting an activity or collection drive to benefit victims of domestic violence. Hubbard House also encourages all social media users to copy Hubbard House’s Facebook and Twitter profile picture of the purple ribbon and post it as their own default picture throughout Domestic Violence Awareness Month to show support. Visit www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse to join the movement!

If you or anyone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook

DVAM Events

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Help raise awareness and send the message that ending domestic violence is a priority in our community. Join Hubbard House in any of the following Domestic Violence Awareness Month activities:

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH YOUTH ART CONTEST – Sept. 20 – Oct. 21

Hubbard House announces its first-ever Domestic Violence Awareness Month Youth Art Contest in an effort to raise awareness about domestic violence among youth. The contest is open to youth ages 5-12 living in Northeast Florida. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org/hh/special.aspx for the official entry form and contest rules. One grand prize winner will receive a party for 10 at Jungle Quest, an indoor facility for kids that offers rock climbing, zip lines, tree houses and more.

PURPLE RIBBON CAMPAIGN – Oct. 1-31

Northeast Florida law enforcement and other city officials will receive purple ribbon pins to wear during the month of October in support of efforts to help end domestic violence in the community. Purple ribbon pins will also be distributed throughout the community at numerous awareness and fundraising events. Individuals are also encouraged to connect with Hubbard House on Facebook at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse and change their social media profile picture to the Hubbard House Purple Ribbon profile picture to show their support for ending domestic violence.

31n31 – Oct. 1-31

Hubbard House will posts on Twitter and Facebook 31 statistics for 31 days about domestic violence throughout Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Also, each day throughout October, Hubbard House will post a blog relating to domestic violence. Follow the posts to learn about domestic violence and share them with your friends, family, and co-workers to help increase awareness. To receive Domestic Violence Awareness Month 31n31 tweets, posts, and blogs, follow Hubbard House on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc, and on WordPress at www.hubbardhouse.wordpress.com.

TAKE BACK THE NIGHT – Oct. 5 (7:30 – 10:00 PM)

Join Hubbard House at the University of North Florida Women’s Center Take Back the Night Rally. Join us at nightfall as we march through the UNF campus, taking a stand through our solidarity, and breaking the silence surrounding sexual or intimate violence against women and girls. For more information please e-mail womenctr@unf.edu or call 904-620-2528.

SEE RED EXHIBIT – Oct. 5-29

Aspiring to break the cycle of domestic violence, Verizon Wireless of Florida, in partnership with Hubbard House and the Jacksonville Public Library System, is taking a unique approach to increasing awareness of this devastating social issue. SEE RED is a provocative exhibit focusing on batterer awareness. The exhibit, created to captivate, educate and visually motivate passersby to stop, recognize the warning signs of abuse, and help end domestic violence, will be on display at the Main Library in Jacksonville throughout the month of October.

GO PURPLE DAY – Oct. 7

Go Purple and show your support for ending domestic violence! In observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Hubbard House asks the community to Go Purple by wearing a purple item of clothing or a purple ribbon, or by hosting an activity or collection drive to benefit victims of domestic violence.

16th ANNUAL BARBARA ANN CAMPBELL MEMORIAL BREAKFAST – Oct. 7 (7:30 – 9:00 AM)

Hubbard House will host its 16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast Thurs., Oct. 7, at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront Hotel. The breakfast serves as Hubbard House’s signature awareness event where community members gather to raise awareness about domestic violence, remember victims who have lost their lives, and honor survivors of domestic violence. All funds raised at the breakfast support the life-saving programs and services Hubbard House provides to more than 6,200 victims of domestic violence and their children annually. The breakfast is presented by Joan Huffman M.D., Mrs. James S. Taylor and the Weaver Family Foundation. For more information or to purchase tickets visit www.hubbardhouse.org/hh/special.aspx.

CLOTHESLINE PROJECT – Oct. 7

Designed to promote social change, the Clothesline Project is an art exhibit created by domestic violence survivors at Hubbard House. The Clothesline Project will be displayed at the 16th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast.

EMPTY PLACE AT THE TABLE CAMPAIGN – Oct. 7

The Empty Place at the Table campaign represents those who lost their lives due to domestic violence last year in our community. This campaign raises awareness about the severity of domestic violence and its effects on our community. An “empty table” exhibit will be displayed at the Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast, displaying the stories of the seven individuals who lost their lives to intimate partner violence last year in our community. In addition, local restaurants, including Magnificat Café, Melting Pot, and Zaitoons Mediterranean Grill, will host the exhibit to bring more awareness about domestic violence in our community and to ensure that these lives are not forgotten.

SOUTHERN WOMEN’S SHOW- Oct. 21-24

Visit the Hubbard House booth and spread community awareness about the dynamics of domestic violence. For more information please e-mail lrclayton@hubbardhouse.org or call 904-354-0076 ext. 209

For more information on any of Hubbard House’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month activities please contact Ashley Johnson by e-mail at ajohnson@hubbardhouse.org or call (904) 354-0076 ext. 212.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-Hour Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month evolved from the “Day of Unity” in October 1981, developed by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence to connect people across the nation working to end violence against women and their children. The first official Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed in October 1987. Since then, events have been held nationally to demonstrate a powerful statement by celebrating the strength of victims and their children.

Hubbard House, in partnership with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and other local law enforcement agencies and domestic violence centers, held a press conference today announcing October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM).

The DVAM Press Conference also addressed the need to raise public awareness about violence in the home and encouraged citizens to unite to help end this devastating, but preventable, social problem. Sheriff Rutherford announced that the city of Jacksonville is experiencing record lows in crime with the lone exception of domestic violence. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s 2009 Uniform Crime Report domestic violence has increased 3 percent in the state of Florida, and almost 10 percent in Duval County. “Although overall crime in Jacksonville is declining in historic numbers, domestic violence continues to be a genuine issue in our community, in our neighborhoods, and sadly among the families that we all know,” said Sheriff Rutherford.

The press conference also marked the launch of the 2010 Purple Ribbon Campaign, in which members of Northeast Florida law enforcement agencies receive purple ribbon pins to wear during the month of October, in support of efforts to end domestic violence in our communities. County Court Administrative Judge Brent Shore also announced that a new domestic violence court was being established to provide additional attention to domestic violence cases and the victims affected by domestic violence. The City of Jacksonville received a grant to fund the court. County judges will preside over the court and will work in conjunction with the City of Jacksonville, State Attorney’s Office, Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office and Hubbard House.

In 2009, Hubbard House provided services to 6,231 women, children, and men affected by domestic violence.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Hubbard House is a nationally recognized leader in domestic violence intervention. Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.