Together We Can STOP the VIOLENCE

With the end of October upon us, it is also the end of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The important thing to remember is Domestic Violence Awareness Month is only 31 days but domestic violence occurs 24/7, 365 days a year.

In fact, it is estimated in the United States a woman is abused every 9 to 15 seconds, and one out of every four women will experience domestic violence sometime during her life. The good news is this is a preventable crime; the first step to a solution is awareness.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month may be ending but we must all continue to raise awareness about this issue. Together we can STOP the VIOLENCE!

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

Know the Issue

Being able to notice and acknowledge the warning signs of domestic violence and abuse is the first step to ending it. Knowing what help is available in our community and the warning signs of abuse could help save your life or the life of someone you know. If you are living with abuse, work to build a personal support network of family, friends, neighbors, minister/priest, co-workers, and domestic abuse advocates. If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship call the Hubbard House 24-hour hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.

Break the Silence

We must all seek to raise public awareness about the issue of domestic violence and promote social change to end abuse. This cannot remain a silent epidemic in our society. Talk about the issue of domestic violence and its effects. Call the police when you see or hear someone being assaulted. You could be saving someone’s life. Demand accountability from the system and from the individual perpetrators. Other ways you can show your support are:

  • Wear a purple pin to raise awareness and honor victims and survivors.
  • Invite a representative from Hubbard House to speak to your class, civic group, workplace or faith community about domestic violence and its effects. (i.e. a Brown Bag Luncheon at work).
  • Dedicate a little time each month to writing letters to the editor, political officials, police chiefs, prosecutors, judges, and public defenders about domestic violence issues.
  • Connect with Hubbard House or your local domestic violence shelter on social media networks works such as Facebook, Twitter, WordPress, YouTube, etc.
  • Participate in the annual Hubbard House Setting the Pace for Peace Domestic Violence Awareness Walk.

Take a Stand

Domestic violence is primarily gender violence, violence against women and children. Each of us needs to take a stand when we see or hear things that minimize or objectify women. Speak up when you hear someone demean their partner. Let people know jokes that minimize battering or degrade women are not funny. Sexist jokes are inappropriate. Let people know you do not appreciate:

  • Materials, events, shows, etc. that confuse sex and violence.
  • TV shows, movies or music that contain violent scenes and/or language.
  • Speech that contains violent images (“I am going to kill you”; or “I’m so mad I could kick your butt”).

Support with Your Time and Treasures

You can volunteer at Hubbard House or at your local domestic violence shelter (in the shelter, on hotlines, in court, with children’s programs, on committees, through fundraising or outreach programs). You can also make a donation or hold a collection drive. Find the way to help that works best for you.

Organize Community Action

Are you ready to take action and get others involved? You can help bring out many voices to add collective power and strength to the issue of domestic violence. Some ways that you can get involved today are:

  • Plan a benefit event for Hubbard House or your local domestic violence shelter to raise needed funds and educate the community about available services.
  • Promote/host awareness events that speak out against the use of violence in the home.
  • Ask libraries and bookstores to set up displays of literature about domestic violence.
  • Keep issues before the public. Write letters to newspapers; perhaps editorials or comments to print media as well as TV and radio.
  • Organize inter-agency activities with police departments, PTA’s, community colleges/universities, women’s clubs, girl and boy scouts, other social and civic groups or human service agencies.
  • Advocate for continued training for law enforcement, medical professionals, educators, etc. on domestic violence.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Ashley Johnson Scott

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Dating Safety

With the increase in its popularity, as well as the reliance on technology today, the internet is a part of almost everyone’s lives. One aspect of life that it has greatly affected is relationships. Last year alone, 20 million Americans used online dating to help find their significant other. In fact, according to the popular match.com, one in five relationships start online.

When looking for love, one must be aware of the possibility and know the signs of abuse.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • 53 percent of domestic violence victims are abused by a current or former boyfriend or girlfriend.
    Women ages 16 to 24 experience the highest per capita rates of intimate violence.
  • In America every 2.5 minutes someone is sexually assaulted. (Rape is the most underreported crime, with an estimated 62 percent of sexual assaults unreported.)
  • 60 percent of acquaintance rapes on college campuses occur in casual or steady dating relationships.
  • 1,006,970 women and 370,990 men are stalked annually in America. (Stalking includes harassing or threatening behaviors such as following a person, appearing at a person’s home or work, repeated phone calls, repeated text messages, or vandalism. With the increased availability of information on the internet through social media and online dating, cyberstalking is becoming a problem as well.)

(Statistics provided by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, www.ncadv.org.)

With these statistics, it is important that individuals looking for love be aware of the possibilities of danger that can come along with dating. First dates are exciting, and can even lead to love; however, you should always take safety precautions – posted below are tips to help keep you safe.

Dating Safety Tips for Meeting Offline (and Dating in General)

  • A background check or a criminal background check online is a great start. If the person has prior violence in their past, the possibility of you being a victim is increased.
  • Always meet in a populated, public location – never in a private or remote location. Stay in public places for the duration of the date.
  • Inform a family member or friend of your plans. Let them know when and where you’re going.
  • Make sure you have your cell phone with you at all times.
  • Stay sober.
  • Don’t do anything that would impair your judgment and cause you to make a decision you could regret.
  • Drive separately to and from dates until you feel comfortable with the person. (In case things don’t work out, you need to be in control of your own ride – even if you take a taxi.)
  • Don’t leave personal items unattended – you don’t want to risk having personal information stolen.
  • It is best not to go back to your date’s home or bring them back to yours on the first date. If your date pressures you, end the date and leave at once.
  • If your date shows signs of jealousy, control, verbal attacks, wants to move to quickly or does not honor your boundaries these are all red flags of abuse. Educate yourself on what the red flags are.
  • At any time if you are in immediate danger call 911.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Lana Schack and Ashley Johnson Scott

Internet and Computer Safety

(Information provided by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, www.nnedv.org.)

Technology can help victims of domestic violence and their children successfully flee their batterers. But what millions don’t realize is the dangerous and potentially lethal sides of various technologies in the hands of abusers and perpetrators. If you are in danger, please try to use a safer computer that someone abusive does not have direct or remote (hacking) access to.

  • If you think your activities are being monitored, they probably are. Abusive people are often controlling and want to know your every move. You don’t need to be a computer programmer or have special skills to monitor someone’s computer and Internet activities – anyone can do it and there are many ways to monitor with programs like Spyware, keystroke loggers and hacking tools.
  • It is not possible to delete or clear all the “footprints” of your computer or online activities. If you are being monitored, it may be dangerous to change your computer behaviors such as suddenly deleting your entire Internet history if that is not your regular habit.
  • If you think you may be monitored on your home computer, be careful how you use your computer since an abuser might become suspicious. You may want to keep using the monitored computer for innocuous activities, like looking up the weather. Use a safer computer to research an escape plan, look for new jobs or apartments, bus tickets, or ask for help.
  • Email and Instant/Text Messaging (IM) are not safe or confidential ways to talk to someone about the danger or abuse in your life. If possible, please call a hotline instead. If you use email or IM, please use a safer computer and an account your abuser does not know about.
  • Computers can store a lot of private information about what you look at via the Internet, the emails and instant messages you send, internet-based phone and IP-TTY calls you make, web-based purchases and banking, and many other activities.
  • It might be safer to use a computer in a public library, at a trusted friend’s house, or an Internet Café.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Impact of the Economy on Domestic Violence

In recent years, one of the most frequently asked question about domestic violence has become “How does the economy affect domestic violence?”  

While economic woes like recession and unemployment do not cause domestic violence, they do commonly exacerbate it and contribute to increases in frequency and severity.

“The ripple effect of an economic crisis touches each and every American. This is particularly true for victims of domestic violence who are seeking help to rebuild lives that have been shattered by an abuser,” said Sue Else, President of the National Network to End Domestic Violence, in a statement released in 2008. “At a time when more and more victims are reaching out for support and services, domestic violence programs throughout the country are struggling to meet the increasing requests for help.”

(Information provided by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, www.nnedv.org.)

Did You Know?

• Domestic violence is more than three times as likely to occur when couples are experiencing high levels of financial strain as when they are experiencing low levels of financial strain.

• Women whose male partners experienced two or more periods of unemployment over a 5-year study were almost three times as likely to be victims of intimate violence as were women whose partners were in stable jobs.

• Seventy-three percent of shelters attributed the rise in abuse to “financial issues.” “Stress” and “job loss” (61% and 49%, respectively) were also frequently cited as causing the increase in victims seeking shelter.

• Three out of four domestic violence shelters report an increase in women seeking assistance from abuse since September 2008.

• The region with the largest reported increase in women seeking help as a result of domestic violence was the South (78%) followed by the Midwest (74%), the Northeast (72%), and the West (71%).

These circumstances create an increase in demand for services, just as emergency domestic violence service providers are struggling with fewer resources. According to the National Center for Victims of Crime, 92% of victim service providers have seen an increased demand in the last year, but 84% reported that cutbacks in funding were directly affecting their work.

What’s Going on Locally? 

Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties, has seen an increase in the demand for services. In the 2010-2011 fiscal year Hubbard House provided shelter for 1,030 victims of domestic violence compared to 892 in 2008-2009 (a 15% increase).

In addition, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has also reported more incidences of domestic violence. Domestic violence police reports in 2009 were 10% higher than in 2008 and, though the number reported went down slightly last year, the amount of incidences reported were still 9% higher in 2010 than in 2008.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Domestic Violence FAQ

Posted below are some frequently asked questions about domestic violence. (Information provided by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, www.nnedv.org.)

What is domestic violence?

Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive, controlling behavior that can include physical abuse, emotional or psychological abuse, sexual abuse or financial abuse (using money and financial tools to exert control). Domestic violence is a pervasive, life-threatening crime that affects millions of individuals across the United States regardless of age, economic status, race, religion or education.

While high-profile cases of domestic violence attract headlines, it is important to remember that thousands of people, who come from all walks of life, experience domestic abuse every day. In a 24-hour survey, NNEDV found that U.S. domestic violence programs served nearly 65,321 victims and answered more than 23,045 crisis hotline calls in one day alone.

It’s important for survivors to know that the abuse is not their fault, and they are not alone. Help is available for those who suffer from domestic violence.

 

What are resources available for victims?

Survivors have many options, from obtaining an injunction for protection to staying in a shelter, or exploring options through support group or calls to a local domestic violence shelter or hotline program. There is hope for victims, and they are not alone. There are thousands of local shelters across the United States that provide safety, counseling, legal help, and other resources for victims and their children. Information and support is available for victims of abuse, their friends and family:

  • If you are in danger, call 911, a local hotline or a national hotline. The U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline provides confidential and anonymous support by phone 1-800-799-7233 or TTY 1-800-787-3224. Locally, Hubbard House can help. Call the Hubbard House 24-Hour Domestic Violence Hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119 to speak with an advocate.
  • Before using online resources, know that your computer or phone may not be safe. Some abusers are misusing technology to stalk and track all of a partner’s activities

 

Why do victims sometimes return to or stay with abusers?

A better question is, “Why does the abuser choose to abuse?” The deck is stacked against the victim when confronted with leaving or not. Often times, for victims there is a real fear of death or more abuse if they leave. In fact, a victim’s risk of getting killed greatly increases when they are in the process of leaving or have just left. On average, three women die at the hands of a current or former intimate partner every day. We, as a community, must do more to ensure the safety of victims when they leave.

In addition, victims may stay because they are made to think they cannot survive on their own, financially or otherwise. Often abusers create a financial situation that makes leaving nearly impossible. A survivor may return to the abuser because that’s the person she the survivor fell in love with, and she believes his promises to change. It’s not easy for anyone to let go of hopes and dreams.

 

Do abusers show any potential warning signs?

There is no way to spot an abuser in a crowd, but most abusers share some common characteristics. Some of the subtle warning signs include:

  • They insist on moving too quickly into a relationship.
  • They can be very charming and may seem too good to be true.
  • They insist that you stop participating in leisure activities or spending time with family and friends.
  • They are extremely jealous or controlling.
  • They do not take responsibility for their actions and blame others for everything that goes wrong.
  • They criticize their partner’s appearance and make frequent put-downs.
  • Their words and actions don’t match.

Any one of these behaviors may not indicate abusive actions, but it’s important to know the red flags and take time to explore them. 

 

Is it possible for abusers to change?

Yes, but they must make the choice to change. It’s not easy for an abuser to stop abusive behavior, and it requires a serious decision to change. Once an abuser has had all of the power in a relationship, it’s difficult to change to a healthy relationship with equal power and compromises.

Sometimes an abuser stops the physical violence, but continues to employ other forms of abuse – emotional, sexual, or financial. Some abusers are able to exert complete control over a victim’s every action without using violence or only using subtle threats of violence. All types of abuse are devastating to victims.

 

Are men victims of domestic violence?

Yes, men are sometimes victims of domestic abuse. A 2001 U.S. study revealed that 85 percent of the victims were female with a male batterer. The other 15 percent includes intimate partner violence in gay and lesbian relationships and men who were battered by a female partner.

  • One in four women will be the victim of domestic violence at some point in her lifetime.
  • Women are 90-95 percent more likely to suffer domestic violence than are men.
  • When we talk about domestic violence, we’re not talking about men versus women or women versus men. We’re talking about violence versus peace. We’re talking about control versus respect.

Domestic violence affects us all, and all of us – women, children and men – must be part of the solution.

 

How does the economy affect domestic violence?

A sour economy does not cause domestic violence but can make it worse. It’s like throwing gasoline on a fire. The severity and frequency of abuse can increase when factors associated with a bad economy are present – job loss, housing foreclosures, debt, and other factors contribute to higher stress levels at home, which can lead to increased violence.

As the violence gets worse, a weak economy limits options for survivors to seek safety or escape. Domestic violence programs need more staff and funding to keep up with the demand for their services. Victims may have a more difficult time finding a job to become financially independent of abusers.

 

What can I do to help?

  • Everyone can speak out against domestic violence. The problem will continue until society stands up with one resounding voice and says, “no more!”
  • Members of the public can donate to local, statewide or national anti-domestic violence programs or victim assistance programs.
  • We can teach our children about what healthy relationships look like by example and by talking about it.
  • You can call on your public officials to support life-saving domestic violence services and hold perpetrators accountable.

 

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

 

Your Old, Broken Cell Phone Can Help End Domestic Violence

Did you know that donating your old, used, or even broken cell phone could potentially save a life?

Through programs such as HopeLine from Verizon Wireless, Hubbard House can provide victims of domestic violence with refurbished phones for emergency situations. Having access to a phone is something most of us take for granted, but wireless phones can serve as a vital link to emergency or support services in a time of crisis, or as a reliable, safe connection to employers, family, and friends, as survivors rebuild their lives.

The importance of a victim of domestic violence having access to a phone becomes clear once you understand that nearly one-third of women murdered in the United States are killed by a current or former intimate partner.

Old, used, and even broken cell phones, donated to Hubbard House, are also recycled through the Shelter Alliance program to raise much-needed funds to support the life-saving programs and services Hubbard House provides to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually.

This Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Hubbard House is holding a used cell phone collection drive and is asking that you please consider donating any old, used, or broken cell phones to Hubbard House to help in its efforts to end domestic violence.

Cell phone donations can be dropped off at the Hubbard House Thrift Store, at 6629 Beach Blvd (between University Boulevard and Dean Road), Monday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

For more information on donating used cell phones or inquiring on how your company, civic group, or organization can hold a cell phone collection drive to benefit victims of domestic violence please call (904) 354-0076.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Hubbard House Receives $1 Million Gift

Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties, is commemorating Domestic Violence Awareness Month and its 35th year anniversary with a $1 million gift from long-time supporter Terry Ward.

The donation will be distributed over the next five years and will help the organization by designating $100,000 a year to the organization’s reserves and $100,000 a year for operating expenses, with a focus on services for children.

“Knowing we can depend on these funds for the next five years is a blessing,” said Hubbard House CEO, Ellen Siler. “Our reserves have been depleted and this will allow us to replenish the reserves and help meet the increased demand for services we have been experiencing.” 

Since its beginnings in 1976, Hubbard House has sheltered over 28,000 victims of domestic violence and their children and helped more three times that number through its outreach services. Last year alone, Hubbard House provided emergency shelter, outreach services and batterers’ intervention services to 6,044 individuals.   

“I have a real special place in my heart for victims of domestic violence and I know that it touches individuals from all levels of life,” said Ward. “I am proud to make this donation in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and in support of Hubbard House and its staff, who continue to work tirelessly to provide much-needed services to our community.”

Ward, who sits on Hubbard House’s board of directors, has been a dedicated supporter of the organization for more than 10 years. Prior to this gift, in addition to operating support, Ward provided significant financial support to the Hubbard House Foundation’s endowment fund, and also helped fund the purchase of a building to house Hubbard House’s Outreach Center.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Warning Signs of Abuse in Later Life

 

The gravity of abuse against individuals in later life is devastating and results in great personal losses, including the loss of independence, life savings, homes, dignity, health, and security. Studies show that up to 10% of the elderly population in America have been abused. In approximately 90% of these cases, perpetrators of abuse in later life are family members. We all need to do our part in stopping this abuse. The first step is spreading awareness and knowing what the warning signs listed below are.

WARNING SIGNS OF ABUSE IN LATER LIFE:

Physical

  • bruises, black eyes, welts, lacerations, and rope marks
  • bone fractures, broken bones, and skull fractures
  • open wounds, cuts, punctures, untreated injuries in various stages of healing
  • sprains, dislocations, and internal injuries/bleeding
  • broken eyeglasses/frames, physical signs of being subjected to punishment, and signs of being restrained
  • laboratory findings of medication overdose or under utilization of prescribed drugs
  • an elder’s report of being hit, slapped, kicked, or mistreated
  • an elder’s sudden change in behavior
  • the caregiver’s refusal to allow visitors to see an elder alone

Sexual

  • bruises around the breasts or genital area
  • unexplained venereal disease or genital infections
  • unexplained vaginal or anal bleeding
  • torn, stained, or bloody underclothing
  • an elder’s report of being sexually assaulted or raped

Emotional/Psychological

  • being emotionally upset or agitated
  • being extremely withdrawn and non communicative or non responsive
  • unusual behavior usually attributed to dementia (e.g., sucking, biting, rocking)
  • an elder’s report of being verbally or emotionally mistreated

Neglect

  • dehydration, malnutrition, untreated bed sores, and poor personal hygiene
  • unattended or untreated health problems
  • hazardous or unsafe living condition/arrangements (e.g., improper wiring, no heat, or no running water)
  • unsanitary and unclean living conditions (e.g. dirt, fleas, lice on person, soiled bedding, fecal/urine smell, inadequate clothing)
  • an elder’s report of being mistreated

Abandonment

  • the desertion of an elder at a hospital, a nursing facility, or other similar institution
  • the desertion of an elder at a shopping center or other public location
  • an elder’s own report of being abandoned

Financial or material exploration

  • sudden changes in bank account or banking practice, including an unexplained withdrawal of large sums of money by a person accompanying the elder
  • the inclusion of additional names on an elder’s bank signature card
  • unauthorized withdrawal of the elder’s funds using the elder’s ATM card
  • abrupt changes in a will or other financial documents
  • unexplained disappearance of funds or valuable possessions
  • substandard care being provided or bills unpaid despite the availability of adequate financial resources
  • discovery of an elder’s signature being forged for financial transactions or for the titles of his/her possessions
  • sudden appearance of previously uninvolved relatives claiming their rights to an elder’s affairs and possessions
  • unexplained sudden transfer of assets to a family member or someone outside the family
  • the provision of services that are not necessary
  • an elder’s report of financial exploitation

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO PREVENT ELDER ABUSE?  

Report  suspected  mistreatment  to  your  local  adult  protective  services  agency  or  law  enforcement.  Although  a  situation  may  have  already  been  investigated,  if  you  believe  circumstances  are  getting  worse,  continue  to  speak  out.  To report suspected elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation in Florida:

  • (800) 962-2873 (For suspected elder mistreatment in the home).
  • (800) 453-5145 (For suspected elder mistreatment in the home, TDD/TTY access).
  • (888) 831-0404 (For suspected elder mistreatment in long-term care facilities).
  • For other states’ reporting numbers, visit the National Coalition on Elder Abuse website or call the Eldercare Locator at (800) 677‐1116.

Keep  in  contact  –  Talk  with  your  older  friends,  neighbors,  and  relatives. Maintaining  communication  will  help  decrease  isolation,  a  risk  factor  for  mistreatment.  It  will  also  give  them  a  chance  to  talk  about  any  problems  they  may  be  experiencing.

Be aware of the possibility of abuse –  Educate yourself on the warning signs of abuse in later life. Look  around  and  take  note  of  what  may  be  happening  with  your  older  neighbors  and  acquaintances.  Do  they  seem  lately  to  be  withdrawn,  nervous,  fearful,  sad,  or  anxious,  especially  around  certain  people,  when  they  have  not  seemed  so  in  the  past?

 

Click here for more information on abuse in later life.

*Information and statistics from National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, www.ncadv.org , and the National Center on Elder Abuse, www.ncea.aoa.gov.

 

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Abuse in Later Life

Elder abuse, like other types of domestic violence, is extremely complex. Every year, it is estimated that 2.1 million older Americans are victims of physical, psychological, and other forms of abuse and neglect. However, abuse to elders is a crime that often goes unreported – statistics show that only one out of every 14 cases is reported to authorities.

WHAT IS ELDER ABUSE?

Elder abuse is defined as any knowing, intentional, or negligent act by a caregiver or any other person that harms or poses a serious risk of harm to an older adult. In approximately 90 percent of cases, perpetrators of abuse in later life are family members.

TYPES OF ELDER ABUSE

  • Physical abuse ‐ Use of force to threaten or physically injure a vulnerable elder
  • Emotional abuse ‐ Verbal attacks, threats, rejection, isolation, or belittling acts that cause or could cause mental anguish, pain, or distress to a senior
  • Sexual abuse ‐ Sexual contact that is forced, tricked, threatened, or otherwise coerced upon a vulnerable elder, including anyone who is unable to grant consent
  • Exploitation ‐ Theft, fraud, misuse or neglect of authority, and use of undue influence as a lever to gain control over an older person’s money or property
  • Neglect ‐ A caregiver’s failure or refusal to provide for a vulnerable elder’s safety, physical, or emotional needs
  • Abandonment ‐ Desertion of a frail or vulnerable elder by anyone with a duty of care

WHO IS AT RISK?

Elder abuse can occur anywhere – in the home, in nursing homes, or other institutions. It affects seniors across all socio‐economic groups, cultures, and races.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Research shows that elders who have been abused are more likely to die earlier than those not living with abuse, even in the absence of chronic or life-threatening conditions.
  • Several studies show that the rates of elder abuse rise as the age of the victims rises.
  • About 48 percent of substantiated cases of abuse involve older adults who are not physically able to care for themselves.
  • Elder sexual abuse consists of non-consensual sexual contact of any kind including non-physical contact such as forced viewing of pornography, forced listening of sexual accounts, and sexual exploitation.
  • Victims of elder sexual abuse are most often females over 70 years of age who are totally dependent or functioning at a low level.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU SUSPECT ELDER ABUSE?

  • If you or someone you know is in a life threatening situation or immediate danger, call 911.
  • Report your concerns – remember, most cases of elder abuse go undetected – don’t assume that someone has already reported a suspicious situation. To report suspected elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation in Florida:
    • (800) 962-2873 (For suspected elder mistreatment in the home).
    • (800) 453-5145 (For suspected elder mistreatment in the home, TDD/TTY access).
    • (888) 831-0404 (For suspected elder mistreatment in long-term care facilities).
    • For other states’ reporting numbers, visit the National Coalition on Elder Abuse website or call the Eldercare Locator at (800) 677‐1116.

*Information and statistics from National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, www.ncadv.org , and the National Center on Elder Abuse, www.ncea.aoa.gov.  

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Domestic Violence: Did You Know?

Who Is At Greatest Risk for Domestic Violence?

  • Females who are 20-24 years of age are at the greatest risk of nonfatal intimate partner violence.
  • An estimated 1.3 million women are victims of physical assault by an intimate partner each year.
  • 85% of domestic violence victims are women.

Violence Begins at Home; Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

  • Witnessing violence between one’s parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of transmitting violent behavior from one generation to the next.
  • Boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their own partners and children when they become adults.
  • 30% to 60% of perpetrators of intimate partner violence also abuse children in the household.

Costs of Domestic Violence

  • The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health services.
  • Victims of intimate partner violence lost almost 8 million days of paid work because of the violence perpetrated against them by current or former husbands, boyfriends and dates. This loss is the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs and almost 5.6 million days of household productivity as a result of violence.
  • There are 16,800 homicides and $2.2 million (medically treated) injuries due to intimate partner violence annually, which costs $37 billion.

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking

  • One in 6 women and 1 in 33 men have experienced an attempted or completed rape.
  • Nearly 7.8 million women have been raped by an intimate partner at some point in their lives.
  • Sexual assault or forced sex occurs in approximately 40-45% of battering relationships.
  • 1 in 12 women and 1 in 45 men have been stalked in their lifetime.
  • 81% of women stalked by a current or former intimate partner are also physically assaulted by that partner; 31% are also sexually assaulted by that partner.

*All statistics from National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, www.ncadv.org

If you or someone you know is affected by domestic violence, Hubbard House can help. Please call the Hubbard House domestic violence hotline at (904) 314-3114 or toll-free at (800) 500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.