A Survivor’s Poem

We received a poem from a resident at Hubbard House, which illustrates the impact your support has on the lives of the victims of domestic violence and their children.  She wrote:

Safe inside your haven I woke up in the night. 

Remembering what happened, I clutched my pillow tight… 

The dreams I could not run from.  The memories within. 

Abuse goes so much deeper than broken bones and skin. 

The brainwashing, the hurt, the fear echoing inside. 

 I know that I can run from it, but I can never hide. 

So I have gone to start anew.  I’ll hold my head up high. 

 ‘Cause I’ll never know what I can do if I never try.

This is one example of the many women who, thanks to your support, have found the strength they needed at Hubbard House to transform lives of pain into futures of happiness and peace. 

 

DID YOU KNOW…

Last year, Hubbard House provided 21,003 hours of counseling and shelter to 1,030 individuals (549 women, 475 children, and 6 men).

Hubbard House Emergency Shelter residents are provided life-saving services that include:

  • Safety planning
  • Crisis intervention
  • Food and clothing
  • Individual and group counseling
  • Life management skills
  • Support groups
  • Assistance in obtaining housing
  • Locating employment
  • Court advocacy
  • Coordinated family outings and activities

By providing victims with access to information and support as well as safe refuge, the shelter services address the crucial needs of victims in the midst of crisis. Learn more about Hubbard House’s Emergency Shelter.  

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Domestic Violence in the Mainstream: Social Media

Social media allows people to share ideas and thoughts with others faster and wider than television, radio or print. Facebook has more than 800 million users and Twitter has more 175 million users. Every minute, 24 hours worth of video is uploaded to YouTube.

In 2010, reports showed that 15 percent of social media users were 17 years of age or younger, 9 percent were between 18 to 24, 18 percent were between 25 to 35, 25 percent were between 35 to 44, and 32 percent were 45 and up. Social media is taking over the world!

Unfortunately, social media has opened up a very public platform for people to promote violence. Listed below are examples:

Facebook groups:

  • National Slap-A-Hoe Society: “… do the right thing and give them a sharp slap to the face”
  • National Beat up an Emo Kid Day
  • International Smack-A-Hoe Day: “you can use a leather glove or … the old fashion way, bare handed.”
  • National Beat up Your Short Friend Day
  • National Kick a Ginger Day: “get them steel toes ready”

These groups encourage people to act violently toward others. An example of this was reported in The Vancouver Sun September 2011 in which a high school girl was kicked more than 20 times at school on Kick a Ginger Day because of her red hair.

Twitter trends:

  • #reasonstobeatyourgirlfriend
  • #shedontmakeyouasammichoncommand
  • #becauseofchrisbrown

Violence trending on Twitter has brought on much controversy by antiviolence activists. A Twitter posting has even been the blame of an argument that led to an alleged murder. Not all trends promote violence but they may lead to violent comments. For instance, just this week #becauseofchrisbrown resulted in responses promoting domestic violence toward women.

YouTube videos:

  • pregnant woman being beaten up by a man
  • girls fighting in school
  • girl slapped by man
  • man dragging woman by her hair across a street
  • comedy making fun of violence toward women

All of these videos were very simple to find and all promoted violence toward woman. YouTube states they have guidelines to address “violent extremist material,” but because of the volume of videos uploaded daily, they cannot monitor what is posted. Instead, they rely on users to flag videos that violate their guidelines.

Take into mind the statistics for Facebook, Twitter and YouTube listed above and try to imagine how many people have been exposed to these violent messages. Taking part in ending domestic violence through social media can be as easy as joining antiviolence groups on Facebook, trending about ending violence on Twitter, and raising awareness by creating an “end domestic violence” video on YouTube. Even changing your social media profile picture to a purple ribbon can show your support in raising awareness against domestic violence. Do your part to make a difference!

Join Hubbard House in its efforts to end domestic violence by connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Lindsay Van-Zant

Domestic Violence in the Mainstream: Music

Music is listened to by 57 million teens and adults each week. So what kind of music are we listening to? Have we ever actually listened to some of the lyrics of our favorite songs? You may be surprised at just how much violence is in music lyrics.                                                                                          

Some songs use violence and derogatory terms toward woman as shown in the song lyrics by Eminem featuring Rihanna “Love the Way You Lie”:

Come inside, pick up your bags off the sidewalk

Don’t you hear sincerity in my voice when I talk?

Told you this is my fault, look me in the eyeball

Next time I’m pissed, I’ll aim my fist at the drywall

Next time? There won’t be no next time

I apologize, even though I know it’s lies

I’m tired of the games, I just want her back, I know I’m a liar

If she ever tries to f***in’ leave again, I’ma tie her to the bed

And set this house on fire

“Love the Way You Lie” is full of violence. These lines explain the thoughts an abuser may have when their victim tries to leave a violent relationship and the consequences of them attempting to leave. The abuser must have control over the victim at all times and if that control is lost, so may the life of the victim.

Mentions of domestic violence can also be heard in the song lyrics of Miranda Lambert’s “Gunpowder and Lead”:

Slapped my face and he shook me like a rag doll

Don’t that sound like a real man

I’m gonna show him what a little girl’s made of

Gunpowder & lead

His fist is big but my gun’s bigger

He’ll find out when I pull the trigger

In the song “Gunpowder and Lead” the victim, because of the pain her abuser caused her, decides that she is going to kill her abuser.

The next song has become very popular over the past few weeks on top 40 radio stations. Foster the People “Pumped up Kicks”:

Yeah, he found a six shooter gun.

In his dad’s closet hidden in a box of fun things, and I don’t even know what

But he’s coming for you, yeah he’s coming for you

All the other kids with the pumped up kicks you’d better run, better run, outrun my gun

All the other kids with the pumped up kicks you’d better run, better run, faster than my bullet

The words are hard to recognize and understand when heard, but listen closely and you will hear that “Pumped up Kicks” is a violent song. The kid in the song has stolen his father’s gun and is planning to use it against other kids and eventually against his father.

The radio stations that air these songs target teens and young adults. Next time you’re taking your children to school and they ask you to turn the music up, take a second to notice the song they are singing along to. Next time you are listening to the radio, stop and think about the words you are singing.  

Can listening to music turn you into a violent person? The more we are exposed to violence, are we more likely to ignore it or replicate it? Who knows the answers to these questions – but what we do know is that we can all do our part to end domestic violence. Try and remove phrases, songs, movies, and TV shows that glorify or downplay violence from your daily activities. Together we can make a difference!

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Lindsay Van-Zant

Teen Dating Violence

Could violence be a part of your teen’s social life or dating relationship? The answer could possibly shock you. While you might think that violence doesn’t affect the lives of your children, surprisingly one in three teenagers report knowing a friend or peer who has been hit, punched, kicked, slapped, choked or physically hurt by their partner. One in four teenage girls who have been in relationships reveal they have been pressured to perform oral sex or engage in intercourse.

WHAT IS TEEN DATING VIOLENCE

Teen dating violence occurs when one partner, male or female, tries to maintain power and control over the other through one or more forms of abuse, including physical, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse.

While young people experience the same types of abuse as adults, often the methods are unique to the teen culture. Teens often are affected by technological abuse.  Excessive texting, threats by text messages or email, or inappropriate postings to social networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace, all constitute teen dating violence.

One in four teens in a relationship say they have been called names, harassed, or put down by their partner through cell phones and texting. Additionally, 19 percent of teens in relationships say their partner has used a cellular device or the internet to spread rumors about them. The use of technology as a tool for abuse also involves fear and the threat of violence.

HOW TO HELP YOUR TEEN

Less than 25 percent of teens say they have discussed dating violence with their parents. By keeping an open line of communication with your teen, you can step in and take a proactive approach to helping stop, or better yet, prevent violence in your child’s life.

Such topics as dating violence, the warning signs of abuse, defining healthy and unhealthy relationships, and respecting one’s self and others need to be discussed. Learn the warning signs of abuse, and the signs of an abusive partner. Be a role model for your child and let them know that values matter and that EVERYONE deserves to be treated with love and respect.

WARNING SIGNS

It is vital to make yourself aware of the warning signs of potential dating violence. Teens that are abused will have some of these signs:

  • No longer hanging out with his/her circle of friends
  • Wearing the same clothing
  • Distracted when spoken to
  • Constantly checking cell phone, gets extremely upset when asked to turn phone off
  • Withdrawn, quieter than usual
  • Angry, irritable when asked how they are doing
  • Making excuses for their boyfriend/girlfriend
  • Showering immediately after getting home
  • Unexplained scratches or bruises

It is also very vital that you are aware of the warning signs of an abusive partner.  One might think these are normal behaviors, yet they are NOT. Warning signs include:

  • Extreme jealousy
  • Constantly putting their partner down or calling them hurtful names
  • Isolating their partner from friends and family
  • Demanding sex or affection
  • Demanding to know where their partner is and who they are with at all times
  • Controlling behavior
  • Unpredictable mood swings
  • Threats of violence
  • Physically hurting their partner
  • Checking their partner’s cell phone, email, or social media without permission
  • Explosive temper

It’s never too early to talk to your teens about healthy versus unhealthy relationships. Need more information? Need tips to start the conversation? Check out some of these great resources:

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vanna Tauch

National Crime Prevention Month

In addition to Domestic Violence Awareness Month, October is also Crime Prevention Month, a time to recommit to ending violence within our homes, our communities and our country.

One of the most important components of crime prevention is you, and your willingness to raise awareness about important issues. One crime that affects millions of Americans annually is domestic violence. Domestic violence is an epidemic affecting individuals in every community, regardless of age, economic status, race, religion, nationality or educational background.

According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement there were 113,378 domestic violence incidents reported last year; 7,830 were from Duval and Baker counties alone. Unfortunately domestic violence is one of the most chronically unreported crimes.

During October, Crime Prevention Month and Domestic Violence Awareness Month, let’s all commit to helping create safer, more caring communities.

WAYS TO HELP

  • Report crime: Call 911 if you see or hear crime happening.
  • Educate yourself: Know the warning signs of domestic violence.
  • Know what services are available for victims: In Duval and Baker counties, victims of domestic violence can find help at Hubbard House by calling the 24-hour hotline at (904) 354-0076 or (800) 500-1119 or by visiting www.hubbardhouse.org. Click here for more important numbers to help victims of domestic violence.  
  • Break the Silence: Help raise awareness about domestic violence. Click here for ideas.
  • Start or get involved in a Neighborhood Crime Watch Program: This allows citizens in your neighborhood to help in the fight against crime, including home security, child protection, drug abuse, domestic violence, etc.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Lana Schack and Ashley Johnson Scott

LGBT Intimate Partner Violence

According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) intimate partner violence occurs in as many as one-in-three relationships regardless of the sexual orientation of the partners.

While aspects of domestic violence in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) communities are similar to those experienced by heterosexual victims, the NCAVP explains that there are unique challenges and barriers faced by LGBT individuals such as:

  • “Outing” or threatening to out a partner’s sexual orientation or gender identity to family, employer, police, religious institution, community, in child custody disputes, or in other situations where this may pose a threat.
  • Reinforcing fears that no one will help the victim because she/he is lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, or that for this reason, the partner “deserves” the abuse.
  • Alternatively, justifying abuse with the notion that a partner is not “really” lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. This can be used both as a tool in verbal and emotional abuse as well as to further the isolation of a victim from community.
  • Telling the survivor that abusive behavior is a normal part of LGBT relationships, or that it cannot be domestic violence because it is occurring between LGBT individuals.
  • Monopolizing support resources through an abuser’s manipulation of friends and family supports and generating sympathy and trust in order to cut off these resources to the survivor.
  • Portraying the violence as mutual and even consensual.

LGBT Domestic Violence Statistics:

  • Approximately 50 percent of the lesbian population has experienced or will experience domestic violence in their lifetimes.
  • Gay and bisexual men experience abuse in intimate partner relationships at a rate of 2 in 5, which is comparable to the amount of domestic violence experienced by heterosexual women.
  • In one year, 44 percent of victims in LGBT domestic violence cases identified as men, while 36 percent identified as women.
  • 78 percent of lesbians report they have either defended themselves or fought back against an abusive partner.
  • The most common age of victims reporting LGBT domestic violence are those between the ages of 30-39 years.

There is a misconception that there is no help available for LGBT victims of domestic violence. The fact is at Hubbard House, help is offered on the basis of abuse, not on sexual orientation.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

 

 

 

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Warning Signs of Abuse

If you take a look at the women around you, one in every four of them will experience some sort of domestic violence in her lifetime. However, many people do not realize they are being abused. Domestic violence can take on many forms, including physical, sexual, emotional, and economic/financial abuse. Just because you are not battered and bruised does not mean that you are not being abused.

The most obvious sign of abuse is fear of one’s partner. The fear is often derived from physical and/or sexual abuse, involving punches, slaps, kicks, forced sex, or any other act of violence that may physically injure the victim. Even if the incidence is a minor violent act or if it only occurred once or twice, it is still abuse. Although the physical violence may stop if the victim goes into a passive mode, the abuse is still present, but has shifted from physical to psychological abuse.

Emotional abuse is often minimized and overlooked and may be hard to recognize. Yet, it is more common than people think and can be carried out in several different ways; verbal attacks, isolation from friends and family, intimidation to cause obedience, controlling behaviors, threats of physical violence, dominance, and humiliation are among the most common forms. The perpetrator may also deny and blame the victim for the abusive behavior.

An abuser’s goal is to control his or her victim, and many times he or she uses money to do so. Economic or financial abuse is when an abuser attempts to restrict the victim’s income and expenses by stealing or withholding the victim’s money or credit cards, sabotaging the victim’s job, preventing him or her from working outside the home, or in any other way controlling the victim’s finances.

If you witness any warning signs of abuse in your own relationship, or in a friend, family member, or co-worker, take them very seriously. People who are being abused may go along with everything their partner say or do; talk about their partner’s temper, jealousy, or possessiveness; have frequent injuries, with the excuse of “accidents”; dress in covering clothes; rarely appear in public without their partner; and show signs of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and suicidal thoughts.

Speak up if you suspect domestic violence or abuse

If you suspect that someone you know is being abused, speak up – it could save their life! Ask them if something is wrong, express your concern, listen, be supportive, and let them know that help is available. Don’t wait for them to come to you, judge or blame them for the abuse, give advice or place conditions on your support. By picking up on the warning signs of abuse and offering support, you can help them escape an abusive situation and begin the transition to a peaceful life.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

 By Vicky Krook and Ashley Johnson Scott

Safety Planning

Safety planning for someone involved in an abusive relationship is a necessary and important step. Often, writing out your plan helps you regain security and control of your life. Your safety plan should be used as a guide and a reminder of ways you and your family can increase your safety. If you are planning on leaving your abuser, it can be a very dangerous time. Women are more likely to be seriously hurt or even killed during or after leaving their abusers than at any other time in their abusive relationships. This is why it is imperative to have a safety plan.

The first step to protecting you and your family is to reach out to an advocate by calling a domestic violence hotline (Hubbard House 24-hour hotline: (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119) to receive counseling and safety planning assistance over the phone. But remember, if you are in immediate danger, always call 911.

For a safety plan to be effective, it needs to be personalized to your situation and updated every time your situation changes. There are general things that anyone should do if they find themselves engaged in a volatile argument; things like staying away from rooms with sharp edges or weapons, rooms like bathrooms and kitchens, or making sure your access to a phone and an exit are not blocked, just in case. A safety plan goes much further than this.

Your plan may involve working out signals with trusted neighbors so they know when to call the police, changing your route to work, working out a code word with children and others so they know when you need help or making sure your children know how to call 911 and know where they can go to be safe. Often, writing out your plan helps you regain security and control of your life. Remember, this plan should be used as a guide and a reminder of ways you and your family can increase your safety. This plan should be hidden in a safe place where the abuser is unlikely to find it. It should also be reviewed and updated on a regular basis if the situation or living environment changes.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE
Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Violent Phrases Commonly Used

Kill. Hit. Bang. Fight. Beat. Shoot. Do you ever use these words? Most people do, without even realizing what they are actually saying. We frequently use these verbs in our everyday conversations to illustrate our behaviors.

Although domestic violence is often a hidden issue, violence is everywhere; seen on TV shows, heard in songs played on the radio, and, for some, even right in front of us in real life. In fact, more than over 7,800 incidents of domestic violence are reported annually in our community.

Have you ever reflected on the phrases you say each day? We’ve all said them – phrases that downplay violence.

10 Violent Phrases Used in Everyday Conversations:

  1. When push comes to shove
  2. Get away with murder
  3. Punch line
  4. Shoot from the hip
  5. Twist your arm
  6. Take a shot at it
  7. Slap in the face
  8. Adding insult to injury
  9. Take a stab at it
  10. Roll with the punches

We can all do a part in ending domestic violence. Try and remove phrases, songs, movies, and TV shows that glorify or downplay domestic violence from your daily activities. Together we can make a difference!

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119.Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Why Don’t They Just Leave?

Domestic violence occurs when one person in an intimate relationship tries to dominate and control the other person either physically, sexually, emotionally and/or economically. People who have never experienced abuse may wonder why a victim chooses to stay in the relationship. Many different factors can hinder a victim from leaving the abuser

  • FearYour partner may threaten to hurt or kill you or someone you care about if you leave.
  • Love – An abuser rarely shows signs of violence in the beginning of a relationship, and once you start loving someone, it can be very hard to let go.
  • Hope – Happy memories blended with promises of a change from the abuser creates hope that the abuse will stop.
  • Denial – Admitting that someone you love is hurting you can be very hard and you may deny the severity of the violence.
  • Blame – Your partner may blame you for the abusive behavior and make you feel like you are responsible and you deserve it.
  • Hopelessness – You may believe that you will never find a better partner that can make you happy.
  • Financial dependence – You may depend on your partner for financial support to survive.
  • Rescue complex – By staying, you may think you can “fix” your partner and save them from their own abusive behavior.
  • Children – If you and your partner have children together, you may think that having two parents are better than one for the children.
  • Guilt – Your partner may make you feel guilty for how much it would hurt him or her if you left.
  • Embarrassment and shame – You may not want people to know what is going on due to fear of embarrassment and you choose to stay in order to keep the abuse a secret.

What many people may not understand is the amount of control and power an abuser has over a victim. Because of this, on average it often takes a victim seven to nine times to leave their abuser for good. However, victims who leave an abusive relationship run a higher risk of being killed by their abuser after they left than victims who stay in the relationship.  Whether a victim decides to stay or leave, it isn’t an easy decision.  He or she has a lot to consider for his or her own safety, and he or she isn’t alone and there is always help available.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE

Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 6,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook