Violence in the Media

Our culture is engulfed in media. We often hear people discussing who has the newest hit song or the best movies out in theaters. Media is one of our top sources of entertainment, but what happens when media is teaching society violence and crime?

Domestic violence is a topic that is frequently taken too lightly in the media. It is often glorified in the songs we listen to and the movies and television shows we watch. Unfortunately as a result, this desensitizes viewers to the seriousness of abuse.

Some examples of violence in the media include:

Domestic Violence in Popular Music

“Misery” by Maroon 5 music video

The video shows a woman constantly beating her significant other (Adam Levine) while he keeps going back to kiss her. He takes the abuse and still wants to be with her. This could give the impression that it is acceptable to stay in an abusive relationship. Although Maroon 5’s intentions probably weren’t to glorify domestic violence, they are making the issue seem as if it is something sexy. Domestic violence is in no way sexy and it has no place in any relationship. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6g6g2mvItp4)

Domestic Violence in Popular Television Shows

“Gossip Girl”

The popular television show “Gossip Girl” has also shown domestic violence scenes. The romantic relationship between characters Blair and Chuck turns violent when Blair tells Chuck that she is engaged to another man. Chuck tries to place ownership over her by saying “you are mine”. He becomes so enraged that he punches a window and barely misses her face with his fist. Blair runs out of the room with a bloody cheek from the glass of the broken window.

This relationship can be seen as romanticizing domestic violence. In the scene mentioned above, teens may think Chuck hit the window behind Blair because he was so in love with her and was angry that he couldn’t have her. Breaking or throwing objects during an argument is not a healthy or safe way to express emotions. Domestic violence and love never mix and violence is never a result of love. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=550-FDajRJQ)

“Family Guy”

Around this time last year, the popular television show Family Guy aired an episode that showed an abusive relationship between characters Brenda and Jeff. This show is known for its offbeat humor, but viewers have noted that this episode has taken the “joke” too far. Brenda tries to stick up for her boyfriend, Jeff, by giving reasons for his abuse. Viewers also see Jeff violently pull and push Brenda outside, call her offensive names and later in the show she is seen with a black eye. Wendy Walsh, co-host of “The Doctors” stated “They made fun of the victim more than they made fun of the assailant. The main theme of the show was about this poor stupid woman who was too dumb to leave her relationship. Domestic violence is far more complicated than that.” The show doesn’t go into any detail about the dynamics of domestic violence and may leave viewers to believe it is an issue that can be joked about. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5qyHEYeGNM)

Celebrities Making Light of a Serious Issue

Joan Rivers’ Controversial Tweet

Joan Rivers took to Twitter to share her opinion about Rihanna’s recent interview about her relationship with Chris Brown. According to Huffingtonpost.com, Rihanna was recently on Oprah’s show talking about her relationship with Chris Brown and she stated, “It’s awkward. I still love him. My stomach drops. I have to maintain this poker face and not let it get to the other part of me”. Joan Rivers responded to this issue by tweeting “Rihanna confessed to Oprah Winfrey that she still loves Chris Brown. Idiot! Now it’s MY turn to slap her”. Rivers not only joked about the issue but also said it was her turn to participate in the violence by slapping Rihanna. While Rivers was trying to make a joke, domestic violence is no joking matter. Celebrities are often very influential in society’s opinions and thoughts about certain issues. Their words and actions can impact people of all ages. A celebrity joking about an issue as serious as domestic violence isn’t acceptable and shouldn’t be tolerated. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/24/joan-rivers-rihanna-chris-brown-domestic-violence-joke_n_1828723.html)

These are just a few examples of the many forms of domestic violence seen in media today. So what can we do about it? How can we express to others that the violence we see in the media can’t be played out in real life? We need to take our part in discussing these videos and songs with others. We need to explain that just because someone’s idol is participating in the violence doesn’t make it acceptable. Whether a person believes the media desensitizes society to domestic violence or not, it is still an issue that needs to be addressed. Get the conversation started to help end domestic violence!           

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Written by: Brittany Mitrick

Advertisements

Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

All children deserve a safe and secure home – free of violence – and parents/guardians that love and protect them. But for many children, home is not a place of stability and support; it is far from a safe haven. Children do not have to see one parent or guardian violently assaulting another to witness domestic violence; they can also hear the sounds of violence and are aware of it from many telltale signs. Children’s exposure to domestic violence has a profound impact on their future. Many kids are suffering silently, and with little support.

Although the number is hard to pinpoint, statistics show that over 3 million children are exposed to violence in their homes annually in the United States. Children react to their environment in different ways, and reactions can vary depending on the child’s gender and age. Here’s how domestic violence can affects children of all ages:

Infants:

  • Cry more and are more irritable
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Digestive problems
  • May resist being held or fed
  • May be developmentally delayed

 Toddlers and pre-schoolers:

  • Low self-esteem and lack of self-confidence
  • More aggressive or withdrawn
  • Exhibit high levels of anxiety and fearfulness
  • Physical issues such as stomach aches
  • Nightmares
  • Problems with toilet training

 Older children:

  • Low self-esteem
  • Feel inadequate for not being able to protect adult
  • May be suicidal
  • Aggressive
  • May lack social skills and do poorly in school
  • Juvenile delinquency or battering in dating relationships

 Although reading this may be alarming and discouraging, the good news is that there is help available. Locally, Hubbard House is addressing the impact of domestic violence on children through its Helping At Risk Kids (HARK) program. HARK is a 12-week program designed to empower children from abusive homes by helping them understand the violence is not their fault, helping them know what to do should they be in danger, and teaching them non-violent conflict resolution skills, so the violence will not be repeated in the next generation.

For more information regarding the HARK program and outreach services or to make an appointment for your child please call the Hubbard House Outreach Center at (904) 400-6300 or visit hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Liz Wallis

Volunteers founded Hubbard House in 1976, and today our volunteers continue to serve a vital role in every aspect of the agency. Why are volunteers so important to Hubbard House? Volunteers contribute their time and energy, their ideas and ideals. They increase our visibility in the community, expand our capacity to provide services and send a strong message of caring to our clients.

It is because of the support and generosity given by Hubbard House volunteers and donors that we are able to provide services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually and ensure that their hope for peace, dreams of tomorrow, and strength for their children are not lost.

This volunteer spotlight focuses on Liz Wallis, a dedicated volunteer, who has been donating several hours a week of her time for the last six months to help Hubbard House with administrative tasks. We spoke with Liz about her experience volunteering at Hubbard House.

Why did you decide to donate time and resources to Hubbard House?  My husband Marc is in the Navy and we moved here from California in March of this year. I wanted to get involved in the community and so I searched online for different non-profits that I could volunteer at that are based in Jacksonville. Hubbard House really stood out to me as a worthy organization and one that would be a great experience to volunteer with. I love helping people and was impressed with Hubbard House’s message and particularly its programs focused on helping children who witnessed violent situations.

What made you get connected with Hubbard House?  The volunteer coordinator, Tracy, was very encouraging and responsive to my online request to volunteer.

What has your volunteer experience with Hubbard House meant to you?  I have really enjoyed my time volunteering and everyone I work with (staff and volunteers) are such great people. Since we are only going to be here a few months longer, it has been nice to feel like a part of an adopted family and not just a passerby. While I don’t work directly with the clients of Hubbard House, I am glad to know that by helping out with paperwork and administration, I am freeing up valuable time and resources for those on the front lines (so to speak). I really believe in Hubbard House and am grateful for the opportunity I have been given to volunteer.

If you are interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities available at Hubbard House please visit www.hubbardhouse.org/help/volunteering/ or contact Tracy Knight at (904) 354-0076 ext. 251 or tknight@hubbardhouse.org.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hot-line at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

Why Don’t They Just Leave?

One of the most common questions we receive is “Why do victims sometimes return to or stay with their abuser?” A better question is, “Why does the abuser choose to abuse?”

The deck is stacked against the victim when confronted with leaving or not. There are many different factors that can hinder a victim from leaving their abuser, including:

Love – An abuser rarely shows signs of violence in the beginning of a relationship, and once two people fall in love it can be very hard to let go.

Hope – Happy memories blended with promises of a change from the abuser creates hope that the abuse will stop.

Denial – Admitting that someone they love is hurting them can be very hard.

Blame – Abusers may blame the victim for the abusive behavior and make them feel like they are responsible and they deserve it.

Hopelessness – Victims may believe that they will never find a better partner that can make them happy.

Financial dependence – Victims may depend on their partner for financial support to survive.

Rescue complex – By staying, victims may think they can “fix” their partner and save them from their own abusive behavior.

Children – If a victim and their abuser have children together, they may think that having two parents are better than one for the children.

Guilt – The abuser may make the victim feel guilty for how much it would hurt him or her if they left.

Embarrassment and shame – The victim may not want people to know what is going on due to fear of embarrassment and they choose to stay in order to keep the abuse a secret.

But in most cases, violence, and the sheer terror of it, is one of the principle reasons why victims don’t leave. When domestic violence victims attempt to leave the relationship, the abuse almost always escalates as the perpetrator attempts to regain control. The most serious domestic violence injuries and a majority of domestic violence homicides occur as a victim attempts to leave or after she/he has left.

The victim knows these dangers. They know them because they’ve already experienced the violent responses when they’ve attempted to assert themselves, even minimally, within the relationship. They know because the perpetrator has usually threatened precisely what they intend to if they try to leave.

Deciding to end an abusive relationship has risks. A victim has a lot to consider for her or his own safety (and the safety of their children). When a victim decides to leave, it can be safer if they get support. There is help available! Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties in Northeast Florida, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to help victims learn about their options and plan for safety.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114. Hubbard House can help.

Other domestic violence shelters in Northeast Florida include:

Clay County: Quigley House, 904-284-0061 24-hour hotline

NassauCounty: Micah’s Place, 877-228-7388 or 904-225-9979 24-hour hotline

St. Johns County: Betty Griffin House, 904-824-1555 24-hour hotline

If one of these shelters does not serve your county please call the Florida Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Ashley Johnson Scott

18th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast

Hubbard House hosted its 18th Annual Barbara Ann Campbell Memorial Breakfast, Thursday, Oct. 11, at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront Hotel in downtown Jacksonville. The breakfast was presented by Alan and Pam Green Family Foundation, J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver and Mrs. James S. Taylor.

More than 550 community members woke up bright and early to attend the breakfast to raise awareness about domestic violence, remember those who have lost their lives at the hands of a loved one, honor those who have survived domestic violence and to send the message that ending abuse is a priority. All funds raised from the event support Hubbard House’s Emergency Shelter.

This year’s breakfast commemorated Hubbard House’s 36th year of serving our community. The event highlighted the progress that has been made in regards to domestic violence awareness and services available to victims.

“Hubbard House exists to give victims and their families a safe haven when they are in danger,” said Martha Pellino, President of the Hubbard House Board of Directors. “We are here so that survivors of domestic violence know that they are not alone and that they have many women and men who care about them and will do everything possible to help them. Domestic violence impacts far too many lives every year in our community.”

This year breakfast featured the stories of three survivors of domestic violence, Starletha Cherry, Stacy O’Brien, and Tammy Taylor, who are all also now program supervisors at Hubbard House.

“Listening to their stories you know why they do this work and sense the passion they bring to their job every day,” said Ellen Siler, Hubbard House CEO. “Star, Stacey and Tammy know first-hand what the victim faces and how very important this work is. They know the terror and the joy of survival.”  

Hubbard House provides services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually. Victims of domestic violence and their children are not charged for the life-saving services they receive.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour Domestic Violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

The Purple Ribbon and What It Stands For

Domestic Violence Awareness Month is a time to remind our country of the hidden acts of violence many women, children and men face daily in their homes; a place they once associated with comfort and love. Wearing a purple ribbon is an easy way to show your support to end domestic violence.

In 2011, there were more than 111,000 reported cases of domestic violence and 180 domestic violence related deaths in Florida. Hubbard House uses the purple ribbon and the color purple to raise awareness about the crime of domestic violence in our community and encourages you to do the same.

Although purple is a symbol of pain and suffering that reminds us of the bruises many people have sustained at the hands of their abusers, purple is also a symbol of hope for those affected by domestic violence. People wearing purple ribbons let victims know someone cares about them, and they want to help end domestic violence. Wearing the color purple or your purple ribbon in public not only raises awareness, but also inspires more people to get involved.

There are many easy ways to display your purple ribbon:

  • Attach purple ribbon pins to your shirt, hat, bag, wallet, keys, etc.
  • Tie a purple ribbon to your car’s antenna.
  • Wear items such as t-shirts, hats and bags with embroidered purple ribbons.
  • Hang purple ribbons on doors that are frequently used.
  • Wrap purple ribbons around highly visible trees and/or lampposts.

In addition to demonstrating support for victims and advocates, the display of purple ribbons throughout a community conveys a powerful message that there is no place for domestic violence in homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, or schools of its citizens.

Remember, while each October marks National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, domestic violence is not confined by calendars. Please help raise awareness about domestic violence by participating in this awareness campaign.

BREAK THE SILENCE DAY: Locally, Hubbard House is asking the community toGo Purple and show support by participating in its Break the Silence Day by wearing a purple item of clothing or a purple ribbon on Thursday, Oct. 11th.

Hubbard House also encourages all social media users to copy Hubbard House’s Facebook and Twitter “No Excuse for Abuse” purple ribbon profile picture and post it as their own profile picture on Break the Silence Day or throughout Domestic Violence Awareness Month to show support. Visit Hubbard House’s Facebook or Twitter to join the movement!

WE WANT TO KNOW HOW YOU “GO PURPLE”: Tell us about your plans and share your photos on Facebook or join in on the conversation by using the hashtag #igopurple on Twitter.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour Domestic Violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Vicky Krook and Ashley Johnson Scott

Types of Abuse and Warning Signs

Unfortunately, domestic violence is still too often considered by many to be a private issue, though it is one that affects the entire community, not just those behind closed doors. It has become one of the most underreported crimes, leaving many victims silent and without help.

The avoidance of this issue leaves many unaware that they may be in an abusive relationship. Often times, domestic violence is only thought about as being physical abuse, though that is certainly not the case. Domestic violence includes physical, emotional, economic and sexual abuse. It does not discriminate either – it can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender, race, sexual orientation or educational level.

 Additionally, it is a social issue that requires the effort of everyone in the community to stop. If we are going to have future generations believing in Every Relationship Violence-Free we need to work together to create a lasting change. Everyone deserves to live a violence-free life.

 Knowing the warning signs of abuse is the first step to ending it.

PHYSICAL ABUSE

  • Slapping, hitting, or punching
  • Choking
  • Kicking
  • Shoving or shaking
  • Spitting
  • Having objects thrown at you
  • Restraining you physically

 EMOTIONAL ABUSE

  • Name calling and insults
  • Verbal attacks
  • Humiliating you
  • Destroying your possessions
  • Harming or threatening to harm your family, friends, or pets
  • Making you feel guilty-makes you feel like you are responsible for the abuse
  • Ruins your self-confidence
  • Plays mind games with you
  • Is extremely jealous

 SEXUAL ABUSE

  • Forcing you to engage in sexual acts that make you feel uncomfortable
  • Forcing you to engage in sexual acts that are overly aggressive or violent
  • Coercing you to have sex through manipulation or threats
  • Forcing you to watch pornography or other things that you dislike
  • Denying you contraception or protection

ECONOMIC ABUSE

  • Not allowing you to work
  • Isolating you by limiting your access to money
  • Controlling all financial decisions without your input
  • Giving you an allowance or making you ask for money

 If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help. Hubbard House provides services free-of-charge to victims of domestic violence and their children living in Duval and Baker counties in Northeast Florida.

Other domestic violence shelters in Northeast Florida include:

Clay County: Quigley House, 904-284-0061 24-hour Hotline

NassauCounty: Micah’s Place, 877-228-7388 or 904-225-9979 24-hour Hotline

St. Johns County: Betty Griffin House, 904-824-1555 24-hour Hotline

If one of these shelters does not serve your county please call the Florida Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-500-1119.

Written by Brittany Mitrick and Dajana Mihaljevic

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press Conference Held to Reaffirm Commitment to Ending Domestic Violence

At a press conference held today in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Hubbard House, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office (JSO), the State Attorney’s Office and Northeast Florida law enforcement reaffirmed their commitment to ending domestic violence.

The press conference addressed the need to raise public awareness about domestic violence and its effects on our community, and served as the launch of Hubbard House’s month-long Go Purple public awareness campaign.

Several JSO officers stood behind the podium donned with purple ribbon lapel pins, which they will be wearing throughout the month to help raise awareness about the issue.

“Domestic Violence Awareness Month serves as a time for us all to come together to focus our efforts on increasing awareness about this issue,” said Jami Gaff Bueker, Hubbard House Chief Development Officer. “Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender, race, sexual orientation or educational level. It is not a private issue; it is a community issue.”

The Domestic Violence Awareness Month Press Conference also served as the official release of the 2011 Domestic Violence Fatality Report. The report is an examination of domestic violence homicides in Duval County from Jan. 1, 2011 through Dec. 31, 2011, and an analysis of domestic violence homicides from December 1996 through December 2011. The purpose of the fatality review report is to identify patterns and trends in domestic violence related deaths which might have been prevented.

According to JSO, 10 domestic violence related homicides have occurred since January 1, 2012, four of which were homicide/suicides.

“People are still losing their lives to domestic violence each year in Jacksonville. Most have never called the police or contacted Hubbard House, yet family and friends knew of the violence. If we are going to finally end domestic violence, we need your help and the help of everyone you know,” said Ellen Siler, Hubbard House Chief Executive Officer. “My hope is that somebody out there will hear what is being said today and will make a call that will save their life or someone else’s life.”

Individuals who are in an abusive relationship, or know someone who is, are urged to call Hubbard House’s 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119.

For more information on Domestic Violence Awareness Month activities and Hubbard House’s Go Purple campaign please visit www.hubbardhouse.org. To view the 2011 Domestic Violence Fatality Report visit www.hubbardhouse.org/domestic-violence/resources

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

###

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

This October marks the 25th observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month evolved from the first Day of Unity observed in October, 1981 by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The intent was to connect battered women’s advocates across the nation who were working to end violence against women and their children. The Day of Unity soon became a special week when a range of activities were conducted at the local, state, and national levels. These activities were as varied and diverse as the program sponsors but had common themes: mourning those who have died because of domestic violence, celebrating those who have survived and connecting those who work to end violence.

In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. That same year, the first national toll-free hotline was begun. In 1989 the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month Commemorative Legislation was passed by the U.S. Congress. Such legislation has passed every year since. See the Presidential Proclamation for National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012.

Domestic violence is a serious, but preventable, crime that affects millions of Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on average, 24 people per minute are victims of physical violence, rape or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States–more than 12 million women and men over the course of a year.

“Domestic Violence Awareness Month serves as a time to focus our efforts on increasing awareness about this issue. Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender, race, sexual orientation or educational level. It is not a private issue; it is a community issue,” said Jami Gaff Bueker, Hubbard House Chief Development Officer.

Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties in Northeast Florida, is encouraging everyone to Go Purple this Domestic Violence Awareness Month by participating in its Go Purple Campaign, a month-long public awareness campaign, beginning October 1, to promote awareness and the prevention of domestic violence.

Share your Go Purple photos on Facebook at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or join the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #igopurple.

“It is going to take all of us coming together to end domestic violence. Participating in our Go Purple Campaign is a very easy and small way to make a very big difference,” said Bueker.

Hubbard House’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month “Go Purple” activities include:

31n31 – Oct. 1-31: Hubbard House will post educational statistics and/or blogs relating to domestic violence every day during October. Follow the posts at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse and share them to help increase awareness.

GO PURPLE ONLINE – Oct. 1-31:Go Purple online by changing your social media profile picture to Hubbard House’s purple ribbon icon (which can be found at www.facebook.com/hubbardhouseinc or www.twitter.com/hubbardhouse). Don’t forget to encourage your family and friends to do the same.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH PRESS CONFERENCE – Oct. 2: Hubbard House, in partnership with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office (JSO), the State Attorney’s Office (SAO), and Northeast Florida law enforcement agencies and domestic violence centers, will hold a press conference announcing October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Police Memorial Building at 501 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The press conference will raise public awareness about domestic violence and its effects on our community and will serve as the official release of the 2011 Domestic Violence Fatality Report. The report is an examination of domestic violence homicides in DuvalCounty from Jan. 1, 2011 through Dec. 31, 2011, and an analysis of domestic violence homicides from December 1996 through December 2011.

CLOTHES LINE PROJECT EXHIBIT – Oct. 3:The Clothesline Project is an art exhibit created by domestic violence survivors at Hubbard House. Survivors tell their story by using words and/or artwork to decorate a shirt and once finished, they hang their shirt on the “clothesline.” The Clothesline Project Exhibit will be displayed at the downtown First Wednesday Art Walk, October 3 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at The Carling.

BREAK THE SILENCE DAY – Oct. 11: In observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, show your support by wearing a purple item of clothing or a purple ribbon throughout the day to help raise awareness. In addition to wearing purple, individuals and local businesses are encouraged to make a donation, host a community benefit or collection drive, or learn more about the issue of domestic violence on this day.

18TH ANNUAL BARBARA ANN CAMPBELL MEMORIAL BREAKFAST – Oct. 11:Hubbard House will host its annual awareness breakfast, presented by the Alan and Pam Green Family Foundation, Mrs. James S. Taylor and J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver, Thursday, Oct. 11 from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m., at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront Hotel. This 500+ person breakfast is held each year to honor the lives of those who have survived domestic violence, to remember those who have died at the hands of a loved one, and to connect those who work to end domestic violence in our community. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org/ for more information or to reserve your seat.

For more information on the Go Purple Campaign or Domestic Violence Awareness Month activities visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org/.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour Domestic Violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Brittany Mitrick and Ashley Johnson Scott