Back-to-school season isn’t only for children!

Many adults decide to seek or continue their education later in life. They may want to get a better job or know more about something they’re passionate about. They may just enjoy learning new things!

For survivors of domestic violence, though, the path toward education can be a challenge.

Education and Abuse

An abuser may sabotage their partner’s efforts to gain an education. They see education as a path to independence for the survivor, and they are threatened by that.

To keep control, the abuser may refuse to pay for classes, deny access to transportation to get to school, destroy homework and class materials, monitor use of technology, and much more. If the couple has children, an abuser may withhold support for childcare, so the survivor must juggle caring for the children while trying to attend school and focus on schoolwork.

In addition to these direct tactics, an abuser may also shame a survivor for their lack of education, call them names that insult their intelligence, tell them people won’t believe anything they say because they are not educated, or embarrass them over their efforts to attend school later in life.

Abusive tactics that affect education can have a very lasting impact. Limiting education can lead to challenges in gaining and maintaining a job or achieving a promotion, which can further trap the survivor in the abusive relationship.

Hubbard House support

Not only does Hubbard House provide life-saving, life-changing services for survivors and children, but we work with survivors to overcome the barriers they face because of the abuse they’ve endured. That includes barriers to their education and employment.

Hubbard House advocates support survivors on their path to employment directly through help with resume writing, job interview skills, career counseling, and more. If that journey to economic independence involves education, Hubbard House supports that in ways tailored to the survivor, like helping secure supplies and materials needed for education and providing childcare in shelter. Advocates will also help survivors with budgeting and other steps to support affording an education.

Survivors, you are strong and smart. Hubbard House supports you and your efforts to learn and grow.

Survivors can learn more about these resources by meeting in-person with an advocate at the Hubbard House Outreach Center (6629 Beach Blvd), calling our 24/7 Hotline at (904)354-3114, or reaching out through our 24/7 Textline at (904)210-3698. All resources are free and confidential.

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