Sexual Assault Awareness Month

This April, the national Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign will focus on campus sexual violence prevention. The goal of SAAM 2015 is to support campuses in creating a culture of prevention and effective, trauma-informed response. Everyone has a role to play in creating safer campuses. It’s time to act to create learning environments where all are engaged in prevention.

What is Sexual Violence?
Sexual violence occurs when someone is forced or coerced into unwanted sexual activity without agreeing or consenting. Reasons someone might not be able to consent include:
• Fear
• Being underage
• Having an illness or disability
• Incapacitation due to alcohol or other drugs

Consent initially can be given and later be withdrawn. Sexual violence is a crime that comes in many forms, including forced intercourse, sexual contact or touching, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, and exposure or voyeurism.

Consent is understood as an affirmative agreement to engage in various sexual or nonsexual activities. Consent is an enthusiastic, clearly communicated and ongoing yes. One can’t rely on past sexual interactions and should never assume consent. The absence of “no” is not a “yes.” When sex is consensual, it means everyone involved has agreed to what they are doing and has given their permission. Non consensual sex is rape. A person who is substantially impaired cannot give consent.

Sexual violence is never the victim’s fault. It does not matter what the victim is wearing or doing, whether the victim has been drinking, or what type of relationship the victim has with the person who is sexually abusing them. For more information about the Jacksonville Women’s Center and Rape Recovery Team, click here.

Myth vs. Fact Information Sheet

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

By: Jordan Bebout

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#Whyistayed

76cd796feb7709acfdd85c2c2951292bIf you’ve been on social media the past week, you’ve probably seen posts with #WhyIStayed incorporated into them. The hashtag began trending nationwide after disturbing video footage was released showing Janay Palmer being knocked unconscious and dragged out of an elevator by former Baltimore Raven’s football player, Ray Rice. The incident occurred in February between the engaged couple, who have since gotten married, but the full video had not been made public until this past week. The video of the incident put a spotlight on domestic violence but also caused people to participate in victim blaming – asking what Janay did to provoke her partner and why she stayed with him.

Beverly Gooden, the woman behind the #WhyIStayed, is a survivor of domestic violence and was stunned by the criticism aimed at victims like Janay. After reading twitter posts from users who had been victims of domestic violence, Gooden tweeted her own story and ended it with #WhyIStayed. She hoped that the hashtag would form a kind of community. Within an hour, the internet exploded with powerful yet chilling stories from other victims of domestic abuse.

“Why doesn’t she just leave?” is a question posed by most when they hear about domestic violence. They don’t realize that victims can’t “just leave.” Abusers hold all the power. Victims are scared, ashamed or humiliated and the nation is getting a glimpse into the world of those victims and why they stayed.

Let’s not judge a victim for why they stayed, but applaud them for why they left. Victims should be given support and encouragement, not criticism and blame. It takes strength to be able to leave, strength not every victim has on their own. Domestic violence awareness should be supported every day.

The video footage and trending hashtag brought into focus the prevalent issue of domestic violence. Every nine seconds in the United States a woman is assaulted or beaten. Help break the cycle by getting involved and raise awareness to end domestic violence.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

By: Kaleigh Williams

Volunteer Spotlight: Donna Partridge

 

Donna PartridgeAs an organization, we are so fortunate to have volunteers that are so passionate and giving. One in particular is Donna Partridge. Donna planned multiple birthday parties for the children at Hubbard House every month and coordinates volunteers to help from Florida Blue. Florida Blue strives to build healthy, strong communities and Donna, along with her coworkers, is succeeding at this every month. Thank you Donna for all that you’ve done and all you do!

Why did you decide to donate time and resources to Hubbard House?

I attended one of the events with another Volunteer at Florida Blue and had no clue what it was all about. Upon arriving there and setting up the birthday decorations and meeting all the children, I could see the glow in their eyes. There was just something about the kids that made me feel special to be a part of this awesome adventure.

They were so loving and I was happy and to see them get excited celebrating their birthdays, it was just awesome!

From the time the party began even up to where the kids taught me to dance, I knew this was my calling. I have grown up loving children and being part of events all my life- even childhood babysitting -was my world. The children at Hubbard House were so grateful for the party and the caring they received from the volunteers made me want to come back.

What made you get connected with Hubbard House?

My choice to get connected with Hubbard House was when the opportunity was presented to me from another Volunteer at Florida Blue who had decided to move on and wanted somebody to fulfill the part of leading and planning the monthly birthday parties – it was an honor.

Once you feel the love of a child and the “JOY” of a smile that you put on their face from planning a special birthday party, like the Carnival Themed Birthday Party, you know God put you there to be more to these children that you thought you could possibly be.

Every month when it is time to plan a party, I put my heart and soul into making it possible right down to planning every little detail. I begin this journey in hopes to make every month special no matter what holiday it was. We’ve had these themed parties: Thanksgiving, Christmas, Rainbow, Valentines, St Patrick’s Day, Carnival, Ice Cream/Candy Social, Luau/Beach Party … And I have plans for Back to School in August, Another Carnival in October, and still making plans for the rest of the year.

Group Photo

I talked to several local businesses around Jacksonville and was able to get donations from one company, toys, school supplies, and even Christmas stockings for the kids. I also was able to get this company to donate gifts for all the mothers there on Mother’s Day to give things to them they may be without.

What has the volunteering experience meant to you?

This has been one amazing experience and I learn more about the kids every time I go. Every month is a different theme and with the help of the volunteers from Florida Blue, we manage to always make it a successful party. Every party is a different fun theme so the kids will always remember those moments whether they stay in the shelter for a month or several months. I want to give each child a good memory filled with fun, excitement and love that they will never forget.

I have truly been blessed with the caring and inspiring children at Hubbard House and hope to be a memory in their hearts forever.

If you are interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities available at Hubbard House please visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org/help/volunteering.

If you or someone you know is affected by domestic/dating violence please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By: Amy Riggan

Volunteer Spotlight: Abby McGeathey

aaaaaaaaaaHubbard House is honored to recognize Abby McGeathey for June’s volunteer spotlight. The agency is very fortunate that Abby has found time in her busy schedule as full-time mom to care for others within our Emergency Shelter. Volunteers are a vital part of Hubbard House! Without giving individuals willing to donate their time and resources, our mission of “Every Relationship Violence-Free” would not even be a possibility. Thank you Abby for all that you do for the families that stay in our Emergency Shelter!

Why did you decide to donate time and resources to Hubbard House?

My decision to postpone full-time employment until my youngest child went into Kindergarten meant that there would be a valuable period of time between graduating college and going back to work full-time in which I could do volunteer work. I felt that volunteering at the Hubbard House would be a great opportunity to give back to my community, gain valuable work experience without the commitment of a full-time job, and help me pinpoint my career interests within the field of social work.

What made you get connected with Hubbard House?

I researched an entire list of non-profit organizations within Northeast Florida in which to volunteer. I chose Hubbard House personally because, as with many others, I have been touched by domestic violence and want to support and empower the men, women, and children seeking “Every Relationship Violence-Free.”   Professionally, Hubbard House offers many different types of work settings and job experiences from within one organization and volunteer opportunities are offered around the clock.

What has the volunteering experience meant to you?

Every time that I leave the Hubbard House I realize I have learned something new about myself, domestic violence, my community, or the human experience in general. Volunteering at the Hubbard House has broadened my horizons and enabled me to do two of my favorite things, better my community and quench my thirst for learning.

If you are interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities available at Hubbard House please visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org/help/volunteering.

If you or someone you know is affected by domestic/dating violence please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or (800) 500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic child care, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit http://www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By: Amy Riggan and Tracy Knight

Hubbard House Loves Its Volunteers!

volunteer hands“Volunteer service brings a special source of personal satisfaction and the opportunity to make a difference in your community.”

This week is National Volunteer Appreciation Week and the Hubbard House staff wants all of our wonderful volunteers to know how much we appreciate all that each does for the organization!

Hubbard House wouldn’t be where it is today without the dedication of its volunteers. When we think of volunteers, we think of how it got its start:

In 1976, a group of women purchased a house on Hubbard Street and became the first emergency shelter in Florida for victims of domestic violence and their children. This establishment was named Hubbard House. Since then, our organization has grown exponentially, all thanks to our devoted and unwavering volunteers.

“I consider it a privilege to get to know each volunteer and the story behind why they have decided to give their time and energy to support this cause,” said Tracy Knight, Volunteer Program Specialist for Hubbard House. “After hearing numerous stories, it all comes down to a love for people. I watch our volunteers show love every day whether in the court room, at the shelter or in our outreach programs – they show love by listening, sharing and just being there.”

Hubbard House thrives thanks to the more than 1,000 volunteers that serve in all Hubbard House programs. Our volunteers not only give their time and energy, but they provide ideas, increase our visibility in the community and help us in supporting our ultimate goal of Every Relationship Violence-Free. The most important skill required of our volunteers is the capacity to care and the willingness to help those in need.

Interested in volunteering with us? There are many volunteer opportunities for groups and individuals. For more information, visit http://hubbardhouse.org/help/volunteering/. Every volunteer’s effort is appreciated no matter how small.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By: Gabrielle Morolla and Lindsay Van-Zant

To Love & Be Loved

couple-holding-hands-Holy-in-the-DailyAccording to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Love is a strong affection for another arising out of kinship or personal ties.

Valentine’s Day is the one day out of the year where love is expressed with lavish gifts and special events. For the remainder of the year, love is expressed through our words and actions. However, for some, those words and actions do not reflect the true definition of love. At Hubbard House, we know what love is and how it should be displayed.

What is love?

  • Love is trusting and understanding, not disregarding and disapproving
  • Love is giving and not taking
  • Love is hugging and kissing, not hitting and crying
  • Love is comforting and enjoying, not intimidating and hurting
  • Love is patient and not violent
  • Love is providing and protecting, not leaving and neglecting
  • Love is respect and appreciation, not disrespecting and abusive

Any form of abuse should not be mistaken as love and affections. Unfortunately, many people do not realize the abuse they are living with is domestic violence and, as a result, do not seek help. To learn more about the warning signs of abuse click here.

How to Achieve a Healthy Relationship

At Hubbard House, we use an Equality Wheel to explain what a healthy relationship should encompass. Listed below are the behaviors and characteristics that allow one to have a nonviolent, healthy relationship:

  • Non-Threatening Behavior
  • Respect
  • Trust and Support
  • Honesty and Accountability
  • Responsible Parenting
  • Shared Responsibility
  • Economic Partnership
  • Negotiation and Fairness

To view our Equality Wheel click here. For more ways to strengthen your relationship visit helpguide.org.

This month be grateful for the love you have in your life and help raise awareness for those who don’t. Everyone deserves to be loved and live violence-free not just on Valentine’s Day, but the entire year.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By: Gabrielle Morolla

Teen Dating Violence is More Common Than You Think

Depression and SorrowFebruary is a month filled with pink candy hearts, chocolate (oh so much chocolate) and teddy bears. However, not everyone is aware that February is not only the month of love, but also the month of awareness – Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.

Teen dating violence is a silent epidemic that has crept its way into the lives of far too many teenagers. One in three teens report experiencing some form of abuse, while more than 2/3 of teens never report abuse to an adult. The effects of dating violence have a major impact on the social, physical and emotional growth of a young person. According to TeenDVMonth.org, over 80% of school counselors acknowledge that they are unprepared to deal with abuse matters among students.

The Effects of Dating Violence:

  • Less attention paid to academics.
  • Increased use of drugs and alcohol.
  • Greater chance of teen pregnancy.
  • Isolation from others.
  • Sexual assault.
  • Shame or guilt.
  • Inability to maintain lasting relationships.
  • Abandoning dreams or goals.
  • Lack of self-confidence.
  • Depression, anxiety, fear or suicidal thoughts.

For Parents:

Parents need to feel comfortable talking to their teens about dating violence. Three out of four parents have never talked to their kids about domestic violence. Now is the time to change that! February 4, 2014 is “It’s Time to Talk Day!” Together we can break the cycle of harmful relationships and teach our teens how to have healthy relationships. For tips on how to bring up dating safety and talking to your teen, visit Itstimetotalkday.org.

For Teens:

What does abuse look like?

  • Physical Abuse: Use of force with the intent of causing fear or injury. Examples of this are biting, shoving, strangling, kicking or using a weapon.
  • Emotional/Verbal Abuse: Non-physical behaviors such as threats, insults, constant monitoring, humiliation, intimidation, isolation or stalking.
  • Sexual Abuse: Any action that impacts a person’s ability to control their sexual activities such as rape, coercion or restricting access to birth control.
  • Digital Abuse: Use of technologies and/or social media networking to intimidate, harass or threaten a current or ex-dating partner. This could include demanding passwords, checking cell phones, cyber bullying, sexting, excessive or threatening texts, or stalking on Facebook or other social media.

Ten Warning Signs of Abuse

Abuse doesn’t discriminate against skin color, the amount of money in someone’s wallet or the car they are driving. Anyone, boy or girl can be effected. Listed below are a few of the common warning signs of abuse:

  • Checking your cell phone or email without permission.
  • Constantly putting you down.
  • Extreme jealously or insecurity.
  • Explosive temper.
  • Isolating you from your family or friends.
  • Making false accusations.
  • Mood swings.
  • Physically hurting you in any way.
  • Possessiveness.
  • Telling you what to do.

No one is immune to experiencing abuse. If you or a loved one is in a violent relationship, please get help.  Please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

Other domestic violence shelters in Northeast Florida include:

Clay County: Quigley House, 904-284-0061  24-hour hotline

Nassau County: Micah’s Place, 877-228-7388 or 904-225-9979  24-hour hotline

St. Johns County: Betty Griffin House, 904-824-1555  24-hour hotline

If one of these shelters does not serve your county please call the Florida Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded in 1976 as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By: Amy Riggan

Why Don’t They Just Leave?

Young Woman Biting Her Finger NailOne of the most common questions we receive is “why do victims sometimes return to or stay with their abuser?” A better question is “why does the abuser choose to abuse?”

The deck is stacked against the victim when confronted with leaving or not. There are many different factors that can hinder a victim from leaving their abuser, including:

Love: An abuser rarely shows signs of violence in the beginning of a relationship, and once two people fall in love it can be very hard to let go.

Hope: Happy memories blended with promises of a change from the abuser creates hope that the abuse will stop.

Denial: Admitting that someone they love is hurting them can be very hard.

Blame: Abusers may blame the victim for the abusive behavior and make them feel like they are responsible and they deserve it.

Hopelessness: Victims may believe that they will never find a better partner that can make them happy.

Financial Dependence: Victims may depend on their partner for financial support to survive.

Rescue Complex: By staying, victims may think they can “fix” their partner and save them from their own abusive behavior.

Children: If a victim and their abuser have children together, they may think that having two parents are better than one for the children.

Guilt: The abuser may make the victim feel guilty for how much it would hurt him or her if they left.

Embarrassment and Shame: The victim may not want people to know what is going on due to fear of embarrassment and they choose to stay in order to keep the abuse a secret.

But in most cases, violence, and the sheer terror of it, is one of the principle reasons why victims don’t leave. When domestic violence victims attempt to leave the relationship, the abuse almost always escalates as the perpetrator attempts to regain control. The most serious domestic violence injuries and a majority of domestic violence homicides occur as a victim attempts to leave or after she/he has left.

The victim knows these dangers. They know them because they’ve already experienced the violent responses when they’ve attempted to assert themselves, even minimally, within the relationship. They know because the perpetrator has usually threatened precisely what they intend to if they try to leave.

Deciding to end an abusive relationship has risks. A victim has a lot to consider for her or his own safety (and the safety of their children). When a victim decides to leave, it can be safer if they get support. There is help available! Hubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties in Northeast Florida, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to help victims learn about their options and plan for safety.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at (904) 354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

Other domestic violence shelters in Northeast Florida include:

  • Clay County: Quigley House, 904-284-0061 24-hour hotline
  • Nassau County: Micah’s Place, 877-228-7388 or 904-225-9979 24-hour hotline
  • St. Johns County: Betty Griffin House, 904-824-1555 24-hour hotline

If one of these shelters does not serve your county please call the Florida Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-500-1119.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

By Ashley Johnson Scott

Effects of Domestic Violence on Children

Hubbard House Artwork6All children deserve a safe and secure home – free of violence – and parents/guardians that love and protect them. But for many children, home is not a place of stability and support; it is far from a safe haven. Children do not have to see one parent or guardian violently assaulting another to witness domestic violence; they can also hear the sounds of violence and are aware of it from many telltale signs. Children’s exposure to domestic violence has a profound impact on their future. Many kids are suffering silently, and with little support.

Although the number is hard to pinpoint, statistics show that over 3 million children are exposed to violence in their homes annually in the United States. Children react to their environment in different ways, and reactions can vary depending on the child’s gender and age. Here’s how domestic violence can affects children of all ages:

Infants:

  • Cry more and are more irritable
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Digestive problems
  • May resist being held or fed
  • May be developmentally delayed

 Toddlers and pre-schoolers:

  • Low self-esteem and lack of self-confidence
  • More aggressive or withdrawn
  • Exhibit high levels of anxiety and fearfulness
  • Physical issues such as stomach aches
  • Nightmares
  • Problems with toilet training

 Older children:

  • Low self-esteem
  • Feel inadequate for not being able to protect adult
  • May be suicidal
  • Aggressive
  • May lack social skills and do poorly in school
  • Juvenile delinquency or battering in dating relationships

Although reading this may be alarming and discouraging, the good news is that there is help available. Locally, Hubbard House is addressing the impact of domestic violence on children through its Helping At Risk Kids (HARK) program. HARK is a 12-week program designed to empower children from abusive homes by helping them understand the violence is not their fault, helping them know what to do should they be in danger, and teaching them non-violent conflict resolution skills, so the violence will not be repeated in the next generation.

For more information regarding the HARK program and outreach services or to make an appointment for your child please call the Hubbard House Outreach Center at (904) 400-6300 or visit hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the Hubbard House 24-hour domestic violence hotline at 904-354-3114 or 800-500-1119. Hubbard House can help.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.

The Allstate Foundation Awards $10,000 to Help Victims of Domestic Violence

allstateHubbard House, the domestic violence center serving Duval and Baker counties in Northeast Florida, has been awarded a $10,000 grant from The Allstate Foundation to support its emergency services and shelter.

Within the last year, the Hubbard House Emergency Shelter provided 29,469 days of safety and refuge to 976 adults and children affected by domestic violence. In addition, 5,430 agency-wide crisis calls were taken.

“Domestic violence is a pervasive and often overlooked social issue that affects thousands of women, children and men in Duval and Baker counties each year,” said Ellen Siler, CEO of Hubbard House. “Through its grant The Allstate Foundation is enabling us to continue to address the crucial needs of domestic violence victims in the midst of crisis.”

Last year, 7,015 incidents of domestic violence were reported in Duval and Baker counties, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

“Since 2005, The Allstate Foundation has helped more than 267,000 domestic violence survivors with life-changing services,” said Greg Guidos President of Allstate Benefits. “We’re proud of the work Hubbard House does every day for survivors and know we’re going to make a difference in even more lives, together.”

ABOUT THE ALLSTATE FOUNDATION: Established in 1952, The Allstate Foundation is an independent, charitable organization made possible by subsidiaries of The Allstate Corporation (NYSE: ALL). Through partnerships with nonprofit organizations across the country, The Allstate Foundation brings the relationships, reputation and resources of Allstate to support innovative and lasting solutions that enhance people’s well-being and prosperity. With a focus on teen safe driving and building financial independence for domestic violence survivors, The Allstate Foundation also promotes safe and vital communities; tolerance, inclusion, and diversity; and economic empowerment. Over the last 60 years, the Foundation has contributed nearly $300 million to organizations and projects in communities throughout the nation. For more information, visit www.allstatefoundation.org.

ABOUT HUBBARD HOUSE: Founded as the first domestic violence shelter in Florida in 1976, Hubbard House is a certified, comprehensive domestic violence center providing programs and services to more than 5,000 women, children, and men annually in Duval and Baker counties. While Hubbard House is most known for its emergency shelter, the agency also provides extensive adult and youth outreach services, school-based education, therapeutic childcare, batterers’ intervention programs, court advocacy and volunteer and community education opportunities. Visit www.hubbardhouse.org to learn more.